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Heading into Election Day 2010, we know that the GOP will gain a lot of seats: if Nate Silver is to be believed, the damage will come to around 53 House seats and 8 or so Senate seats.  Assuming that there is no systemic undercounting of Democrats in the polls, this is extensive damage that far outpaces the usual losses for a political party in power in a midterm election.

Many legions of pixels and barrels of ink have been spilled about why this is likely to be.  Most cogent analysis focuses simply on the bad economy, and a messaging or policy failure on the part of the Democrats.  There certainly have been many things that one could have wished Dems had done differently over the last two years, and that will be the subject of a later post.

But there's obviously more to it than that.  There's a strong sense of grievance out there in the conservative base that goes far beyond generic upset with Democratic policies, or ignorance of the benefits Democrats have provided; it's been discussed at length in generic terms by Thomas Frank, Matt Taibbi and many others.  Many simply write it off as racism, the natural byproduct of the shock of having elected an African-American president named Barack Hussein Obama.  Perhaps.  But few have captured the essence of the backlash as succinctly as does Tom Junod at Esquire:

Republicans, who once decried the rise of identity politics, now practice it so relentlessly, so ruthlessly, and above all so successfully that they've created a beleaguered minority where only a cosseted majority stood before. It is a kind of super minority, its material well-being encroached upon by the swelling ranks of the shiftless poor and its spiritual well-being encroached upon by shadowy "elites" whose figurehead is in the White House. And the odd hallmark of the new identity politics is that it requires a denial of identity: because of who you are, you can't even say who you are. You can't say you're a Republican; you have to say what my friend says, which is that he's "more Libertarian these days." You can't say that or say that you're wealthy or, God forbid, rich; you have to say that you "do all right," and "make good money," but that's only because you work hard. And you can't ever say that you're white, because, as my friend insists, "skin color is irrelevant. C'mon, you know me. You know I'm no racist."

Now, my friend is right: I know who he is, and I know what he's not. But I also know that an identity politics that requires a denial of identity also requires a response to the denial of identity — and the response is rage. Because of who they are, you can't say who you are, and it is by this dynamic that yesterday's Silent Majority becomes today's Tea Party, gaudy and loud in its discontent, and that my friend becomes part of a privileged majority that perceives itself as an underprivileged minority — one of the Sore Winners.

This rings very true.  I know several people who I know aren't really racists in the proper sense--or at least not as racist as most of the people around them.  But they feel themselves to be culturally part of the underprivileged, even though most of the them are fairly well-off.  These aren't people disaffected by the economy, nor are they the super-rich.  They call themselves moderates or independents.  But they have heavy a chip on their shoulder, and speak as if they want to express a political viewpoint that they can't really put into words.

That's not because they're inarticulate; it's because they're either embarrassed to do so, or don't want to admit the source of their animus--even to themselves.  It has to do with a sort of ineffable wounded pride, a deep-seated loss of sense of privilege that Junod calls Sore Winnerdom.

This is what you hear again and again from the Sore Winners, whether you hear it from the professional Sore Winners or the Sore Winners who happen to be your friends: the conviction that no amount of financial success, political domination, religious hegemony or cultural currency is sufficient to take away the sting of being looked down upon....

It is one of the biggest dividing lines between liberals and conservatives: sensitivity. Liberals are supposed to be the sensitive ones, but even the liberals who worked themselves into a froth over George W. Bush never really cared very much about what he thought of them. But conservatives care what President Obama thinks. They care to the point of imagining what he thinks...

This is an excellent point that I haven't seen made before.  Seriously--if you believe that President Obama is an enemy of freedom, Mom, and Apple Pie, who cares what he thinks of you?  I never spent one second worrying about what George Bush and Dick Cheney thought about people like me.  I just wanted them out of office, and away from the power to do any more damage.

Worrying about what someone who doesn't think about you thinks about you: this is the essence of Sore Winnerdom, and it is no accident that it also the essence of the Republican animus. The Republican party was small and hidebound — the party of country-club corporatists, and the range-war West — until, with the Reagan Revolution, it began grafting unto itself the legions of the disaffected: the Christianists, the Southerners, the blue-collar workers displaced by the collapse of America's industrial base and estranged from the unions that failed them. The Tea Party, in this sense, is not a new development so much as it is part of an ongoing migration of the perpetually petulant...

Yes, I know: There have been countless articles and blog posts that attempt to puzzle out the inexplicable anger of the American electorate, when an even cursory scan of the unemployment numbers provides all the explanation you'll ever need. But, as has been pointed out and proven elsewhere, Tea Partiers tend to be quite well-off (how else would they afford all those trips to DC in their RVs?), and much of the populist rage at Obama has been fomented by the captains of American finance and industry: the Sore Winners. And once you've spent time with a Sore Winner, or entered into a debate with one, you feel that there's something afoot in America — something that's reflected in debates about policy but is never quite stated in them, and is still unnamed.

This is ultimately what it's all about.  In the end, the sense of grievance boils down to anger that their worldview is no longer considered acceptable in polite society.

Ayn Rand's "ideas" aren't OK in polite society anymore.  It's not acceptable anymore to think that it's OK to have debtor's prisons and soup lines even as some people smoke cigars at Versailles-like estates.  It's not OK in polite society anymore to think of those of a differing race as literally another breed of human.  It's not OK in polite society anymore to make sexist or racist jokes, or to hold women to a sexual double-standard anymore.  Homophobia and religious wackoism aren't acceptable in most open polite society anymore either.

It's not that these evil "ideas" have gone away.  It's that those who hold them are forced to hide their views under the radar, even as more and more of their unacceptable BS is forced under the table.

So now there is this huge sense of grievance, this resentment that the traditionally overprivileged feel that they aren't really allowed to say what they really think, and to elect a government that will act on how they really feel.  They feel like they're living in Orwell's 1984, where Newspeak has taken over, but today it goes by the name "political correctness", the curse of older white men everywhere.  Bizarre, but true.

That's what the "Tea Party" is, and that's what this conservative backlash is all about.   And they're terrified that the next generation won't even remember that they're supposed to feel outraged.  They're right to be terrified.  Because if there's one solace we can take from all this, it's that their worldview is quite literally physically dying, one year at a time.

And you know what?  I guess I'm supposed to try to understand these people.  I know a lot of them.  Some of them are close relatives.  But I really don't care to.  I don't care about their wounded pride, I don't care about their precious gated communities, and I don't care about their hurt sense of entitlement.  Frankly, my dear, I don't give a d***.  I just want to laugh in their faces and mock them.

Originally posted to thereisnospoon (David Atkins) on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:13 AM PDT.

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  •  Tip Jar (438+ / 0-)
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  •  Interesting, but (55+ / 0-)

    I think it's the same group of right wingers we always have had.  The reason the votes are going poorly is 9.5% unemployment and a loss of hope among many middle class folks.  

    Sore Winnerdon is too much sociology/social pyschology for me.  Sometiems the answer is more simple.  

    Fix the economy and the 5 or 10% of voters who voted for Obama in some states and now won't vote Dem will shift back.

    Deoliver47, quoting Bernice Johnson Reagon: "If you're in a coalition and you're comfortable, you know it's not a broad enough coalition"

    by TomP on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:20:14 AM PDT

  •  here's to the laughing and mocking to their faces (6+ / 0-)

    I've been doing it for years and it feels oh so good...

    It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment. Ansel Adams -6.5 -6.75

    by Statusquomustgo on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:22:06 AM PDT

  •  This is why "liberal" replaced "Jew" (58+ / 0-)

    Overt antisemitism is no longer acceptable in polite society. So it must resort to euphemism. The euphemism, of course, soon gets enunciated with the same tone of venom and the same metaphors as the original word.

  •  I Think There's a Huge Backward Arrow There: (20+ / 0-)

    anger that their worldview is no longer considered acceptable in polite society.

    They live in polite society. They've never left polite society.

    Their anger is that aliens and elites took over their society and fucked everything up.

    So now they're going to take it back, and restore their worldview to its rightful control of society.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:35:49 AM PDT

  •  But for your unnecessarily mean-spirited (6+ / 0-)

    ending, quite an interesting read.

    You see, the spite you reveal at the end makes me doubt whether you really get them.

    •  Tout comprendre, tout pardonner? (7+ / 0-)

      If we empathize sufficiently with their wounded sense of entitlement, we will cease to detest gated communities and coded racism?

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:41:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I think they are not all the same. (11+ / 0-)

        The wanton need I see with that mean-spiritedness at the end of the diary, the need to vilify all Republicans as equally monstrous, is a problem.  It is tempting because not only does it alluringly seem to bear up to scrutiny, it feeds our need to assert moral righteousness.  

        But it is not about us, it's about politics. About electing better Dems.  About gaining power.

        I have been guilty of the conceit perhaps more than anyone I know.  And this need on my part has prevented me from discerning until recently the opportunity we as Democrats have missed for decades. Bagger Republican violence has only just started.  What they will be unable to secure at the ballot they will attempt to maintain through violence and intimidation.  And this underlying brutishness once boiled over and hardened will be the rock upon which the Republican base will break.

        But only if we are there to take advantage and shame those with enough decency in themselves back into reality.

        And that will require both a carrot and a stick.  The carrot of understanding and the stick of shame.

        There is no understanding at the end of the diary. Only bile.

        •  Good points. Actually I've long thought (12+ / 0-)

          that the very thing that drives us crazy about Obama -- his moratorium on drama, his reluctance to demagogue or resort to emotionalism, his insistence on offering olive branch after olive branch, his fundamental commentment to GOOD MANNERS -- are in fact the very things that allowed his unprecedented, historic election with massive support from moderates.  

          I'm just crossing my fingers that this particular kind of across-the-board non-partisan appeal to good sense, has not been outbalanced by false information about non-existing tax increases and non-existent stimulus failures.

          "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

          by lgmcp on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:53:02 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Here's what makes this so difficult (10+ / 0-)

            A certain amount of my own personal rage at the other side disappears - at least toward specific individuals - when they reject fear-based manipulation and sore-winner politics and just try to win on ideas, even ideas I disagree with.

            I met Bob Inglis once in Iraq, and despite myself I kind of liked the SC GOP congressman at least on a personal level.  He asked good questions, he was bright, he was basically a nice guy.  I disagree on nearly every substantive issue of policy, and I would vote against him, but he wouldn't freak me out as a neighbor.  I actually felt bad for him when he told his rabidly insane electorate to turn off Glenn Beck once in a while. But that statement helped his opponents gin up the rage machine and he lost his primary.

            Obama comes from a state in which respectful difference of opinion once was the norm. And he is polite, having built a career out of running as hard and fast as he could from the stereotypical image of black leaders like Al Sharpton or even Jesse Jackson, who can be interpreted by white voters to be aggressive or dangerous.  It's his very reluctance to confront and his carefully cultivated effort to appear non-scary to white voters that paradoxically leaves him totally exposed when he becomes the focus of manipulated rage by so many.

            The fate of Bob Inglis - a very conservative but decent man - bodes ill for Obama. I've come to believe that this middle ground of indpendents don't adhere particularly well to the high opinion most of us Americans have of our average fellow citizen.  You can speak rationally to an angry mob, but as long as the conditions are right for counter-revolution, they will try to destroy you anyway.  Confronting a mob requires confrontation, and while Bob Inglis tried and failed, my sense is that Obama won't try to confront at all.  I hope I'm wrong, but I think the rhetoric about bipartisanship will only increase after next week.

            Then we will just have to see if the nation's economy recovers sufficiently despite the GOP's efforts to manufacture one horrible crisis after another. The idiots in the middle will drift toward whatever manipulator comes along in 2012 if we remain in the economic doldrums.

            "Die Stimme der Vernuft ist leise." (The voice of reason is soft)

            by ivorybill on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:25:34 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I find myself in complete agreement (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              basquebob, ivorybill, LillithMc

              and yet see what you've written and complimentary, not contradictory, to what I think.  And advocate.   I am a pugilist at heart, and it is the passion of my beliefs that many conservatives respect, as they go in for that kind of thing.

              To whit: we liberal dems should confront bigotry and small mindedness in a way that attracts and does not repel others to our cause.  KO does a great job for rallying the base.  Where he fails is broadening the base, which is a true shame because he quite deftly articulates that this really is a battle between We the People and the Rabid Mob.

              Obama has broadened the base - perhaps too much. I agree with you that he could tone down his moderateness and ratchet up the fire. Indeed, it was his fire that attracted so many.

              Still, he is the President now, and his Presidential approach to the partisan hackery that assails him will, I believe, pay off for him and our party.

        •  I didn't read it that way (9+ / 0-)

          The wanton need I see with that mean-spiritedness at the end of the diary, the need to vilify all Republicans as equally monstrous, is a problem.  It is tempting because not only does it alluringly seem to bear up to scrutiny, it feeds our need to assert moral righteousness.

          I didn't feel like the diarist was referring to all republicans, rather to those angry sore winners. And the do not make up the entire party.

          http://www.storyofstuff.com/ When it gets harder to love, love harder! - Van Jones

          by bluesheep on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:56:25 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  My view is part is that (7+ / 0-)

      all they've had for a long time is their wounded sense of entitlement, their obsession with form over substance, their petulant hypocrisy, and their galling insistence that criticism for these faults is unAmerican.

    •  Funny. I was going to say the ending (10+ / 0-)

      is unnecessarily gentle to these self-absorbed shitheads.  

      In the sea, Biscayne, there prinks
      The young emerald evening star,
      Good light for drunkards, poets, widows,
      And ladies soon to be married.

      by looty on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:53:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  i get them (17+ / 0-)

      because I've lived around them for a long, long time.  And again, they're not actually virulently racist or evil.

      But they are mewling, pathetic and self-absorbed.  And I just can't bring myself to care about their whining regard for a lost time when they were able to express soft bigotry and get away with it.

    •  Absolutely agree. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Plubius, VTCC73

      "I just want to laugh in their faces and mock them" strikes me as more "Sore Winnerdom" than what the diarist articulates.

      "We have so much time and so little to do. Strike that, reverse it." -- Willy Wonka

      by Huginn and Muninn on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:19:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Good point (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Plubius

      Perhaps pity is a better jumping off point than mockery. Consider them as being in a special category of disability, requiring accommodation or rehabilitation?

      •  I think they would interpret, rightfully, (8+ / 0-)

        such pity as condescension, the condescension of the librul elite that has waged the  'culture war' against their prejudice and privilege that angers them in the first place.  

        I've dealt a fair amount with (rural)  WA state Republicans individually. I get to know them outside of political stuff.  If and when politics come up, initially I do a lot of listening and nodding.    When they find out I'm a Democrat, many are surprised, even though they know I live in Seattle and if they've seen my car, they would have seen my Obama/Biden bumper sticker.  You see, they've interpreted my previous behavior as agreement.   Not only as agreement. Something more.  They've gotten to know me, even if only a short while, as well a regular guy.  Y'know, one of them.  A guy who drinks beer, cares about his family and so forth.  Many are surprised because they think the same thing about Democrats and liberals as many here seem to think about Bagger Republicans: selfish unAmerican shit heads.

        Even in very brief exchanges,  even when my wife is with me And my wife is Japanese, I am friendly and polite. A face.  A person.

        That makes all the difference.  

        Oh, to be sure, there really are assholes out there, and I have met more than a few.  But the small minded bigot who allows his or her hate to run over their basic decency is a minority.

        The problem is groups, when the otherwise decent people harboring their private prejudice and wounded pride get together and let themselves get taken   by the mob mentality .  It is that ugliness that we see on TV and the internets.  

        But it is not the whole story.

        •  i live in that rural WA, (0+ / 0-)

          more or less, and i'm not sure i can agree with you except on the most basic level. hell, i didn't even vote on ANY of the local races because there wasn't a single non-rethug candidate on the ballot here. (i did vote the fed race and the initiatives, etc).

          it's lonely here.

          "Liberalism is trust of the people, tempered by prudence; conservatism, distrust of people, tempered by fear." Gladstone, Me -8.88/-7.08

          by zedaker on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 03:00:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  What is there to get? (0+ / 0-)

      When they treat the other side with respect AND realize that respect is to be earned, they will no longer be mocked and ridiculed.

    •  Your assuming the point of this... (0+ / 0-)

      ...is to actually help them feel better about themselves. But really, I don't care about their feelings. I just want to keep them contained so they won't cause harm to others. In order to do that I have to understand them.

  •  Back when I was a young feminist and the term (37+ / 0-)

    "Political correctness" had barely entered the American lexicon, there was much pooh-poohing of uptight women who thought it was insulting to be called "girls", or minorities who dared to make a fuss that ethnic jokes were offensive.  

    At that time it was very common, almost de rigeur, for rightwingers to tell us that "there is no such thing as a right not to be offended".  No creation of new rights, see -- that would be contrary to constitutional originalism, and so on.  

    Yet NOW, the shoe is very much on the other foot.  There IS a right not to be offended, and it is the sole and only reason for blocking marriage equality -- because it would offend them.  Not hurt them.  Not change  them.  Not force their precious churches to alter any sacrements.  But just, by merely existing, cause outrage. THEIR outrage.

    Yes, whatever happened to the old rightwing saying, "There is no such thing as the right not to be offended"?

    "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

    by lgmcp on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:37:46 AM PDT

  •  Nate still has Crist with almost no chance to win (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    drmah, GoogleBonhoeffer

    Florida. I think that is changed with the Meek issue.
    And they say Charlie Crist would caucus with democrats.

  •  W.E.B. Dubois' theory of the "psychic wage" (49+ / 0-)

    suggests that whites, no matter how poor or exploited they are in reality, can derive some psychological satisfaction from their perceived and culturally reinforced sense of superiority to blacks. By extension this applies to other ethnic groups, women, gays, etc. As it has become less acceptable for bigoted whites to openly aggrandize themselves by denigrating  these groups, they have seen a steady erosion of their psychic wages. The election of Barack Obama, the ascent of women to powerful positions, the demand for gay marriage, etc, are seen as direct assaults upon their "privileged" status. And of course the actually privileged and powerful classes have lost no time in exploiting this sense of grievance for their own ends.

    Plangentarchy: dictatorship of the whiners

    by Perry the Imp on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:41:19 AM PDT

    •  Excellent comment. (9+ / 0-)

      Deoliver47, quoting Bernice Johnson Reagon: "If you're in a coalition and you're comfortable, you know it's not a broad enough coalition"

      by TomP on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:58:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  While I agree with that (4+ / 0-)

      there's also the "zero sum game" factor.  

      If someone else benefits, I must be losing.

      Minorities and women in the workforce?  The only way that can happen is if white men lose their jobs.  Mexicans coming across the border?  Well, of course they are taking away jobs from real Americans.  Blacks want to vote?  Well, they must be cheating because they want to take a bigger slice of the pie... and that means less for me.

      I think you are right about angry whites not wanting to be on the very bottom of the heap, and that if they have to spend their lives kissing up, they want someone to kick down.  

      But it is at least equally about a different form of deep insecurity - the feeling that the pie is finite, and if someone else does well it must be to one's own detriment.  Ugly, yes, but I don't think you can discount "zero sum game" thinking.

      "Die Stimme der Vernuft ist leise." (The voice of reason is soft)

      by ivorybill on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:49:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  That is true it's a factor (0+ / 0-)

        and it's not just an illusion - there are still real and tangible advantages attached to white skin and maleness. The more you see those as being your only assets the more you are threatened by their dilution. The tragedy is that, even leaving aside the claims of fairness, compassion etc and appealing only to self-interest, the benefits of making common cause overwhelmingly outweigh those of circling the wagons, as has been proven over and over when people did unite around some issue or struggle,  but fear makes people blind to this.

        Plangentarchy: dictatorship of the whiners

        by Perry the Imp on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 03:03:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I actually think (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ohmyheck, FiredUpInCA

    This has a lot to do with what we are seeing. Most here probably won't even want to admit it but I think you are on to something.

    "Opulence! I has it. I like the best!"

    by HartfordTycoon on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:45:59 AM PDT

  •  Bravo (10+ / 0-)

    You hit the nail on the head:

    This is ultimately what it's all about.  In the end, the sense of grievance boils down to anger that their worldview is no longer considered acceptable in polite society.

    And this scares these folks to death. What happens when the majority really believes that power belongs to everyone, not just the traditional power brokers? They can smell this time coming, and they are, literally, terrified.

    Remember all the fear of slave rebellions? Yeah, it's just like that!

    ...one foot out the DKos door...

    by angeleyes on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:47:19 AM PDT

  •  Great read, thanks! (5+ / 0-)

    I can't say yet if I agree or not, I'll have to let it stew in my brain for a while.

    I only know a very few libertarians, and it sort of fits. But I think there's more to it than that - a brainwashing and riling up with RW propaganda to the point that people aren't thinking straight. A collective craziness like our country experienced during the salem witch trials and the McCarthy era, with a weird dynamic of self-policing and paranoid becoming more extreme for fear of being seen as an "enemy" sympathizer.

    http://www.storyofstuff.com/ When it gets harder to love, love harder! - Van Jones

    by bluesheep on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:47:50 AM PDT

  •  Rock on Barack Hussein Obama (5+ / 0-)

    Call it racism or "racism plus," the right wing angst against our President is borne of the worst parts of humanity, as are their views which aren't acceptable in polite society.

    Here's some cool neuvo surf rock with a mention of our man:

    "I don't wanna be your Russian bride not anymore.
    Barack Hussein Obama would have a field day if he knew at all."

    Pionta Guinness, le do thoil!

    by surfbird007 on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:51:46 AM PDT

  •  Emphasizing the class nature (9+ / 0-)

    of the movement is really where its at. Kudos.

    The frog jumped/ into the old pond/ plop! (Basho)

    by Wolf10 on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:54:27 AM PDT

  •  Could NOT agree more. (22+ / 0-)

    the sense of grievance boils down to anger that their worldview is no longer considered acceptable in polite society.

    I'm a psychotherapist, and so I am psychologically minded and your idea resonates with me.

    I think there's an unconscious awareness for these sore winners that their days are numbered and "the world" (meaning the intellectual, scientific and educational elites) are passing them by and this is causing a lot of anger and angst.

    This group overlaps with the lower/middle class white people with conscious and unconscious racial prejudices, which is why you end up with such a weird class range in the Teabagger Party.

    Lisa

    All Kossacks are my allies, but if you can't express your thoughts in a civil and kind manner, I won't be engaging in a conversation with you.

    by Boston to Salem on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:54:56 AM PDT

  •  The Unspoken Thing (19+ / 0-)

    The Republicans want to end the Republic.

    No should be caught by surprise by the changing demographics, by the emerging demise of mass media (the basis of totalitarianism) or by the inexorable tendency of younger generations (in a free society) to break with their elders on one or more values as they develop their own identities.

    The Republicans aren't.

    They see that the future America will be run by a very numerous Millennial generation that does not have a problem with its own diversity. They also see that this generation has a lot of fight in it. It's not going to back off and it's going to outlast the current crop of conservatives.

    Now, 30-40 years from now, plenty of Millennials will be Republicans (or whatever right wingers will be calling themselves in the 2040s).

    But they won't be like today's Republicans.

    Any more than today's are like the Republicans of the 1980s that they worship. Not even close.

    Those Republicans still liked America, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Oh, they had a rather divergent view of how to interpret such things but they weren't a closeted regime-change movement.

    Today's Republicans are.

    They want the current Constitution gone.

    They want the current system of government gone.

    Why?

    Simple.

    It's majority rule and Republicans cannot compete with the emerging coalition of youth, progressivism and diversity that is going to rise to prominance in this decade (setting aside possible setbacks here and there on the way).

    And they know this.

    Republicans want to end the Republic.

    Otherwise, they fear, they will be ended as a political party.

    I don't happen to think that's so.. but this is the inchoate objective they are ginning themselves into supporting.

    I hear it all the time. I read it all the time. Open comments about coup d'etat...about violence...musings-aloud that perhaps democracy doesn't work if "uneducated voters" are let into the franchise.

    That's the dog whistle for...minorities and young inexperienced sorts, lumped together. I mean, they might not even be legal residents. (We better bring back literacy tests and property requirements.)

    Thing is, it's far past a push for more restrictive voting rights.

    If you see a peculiar slackening off in Republican voter turnout, something that truly no one is expecting in the media narrative, consider this possibility:

    It's because people aren't getting angry to vote.

    They're getting angry to fight for something much more ambitious - not just a permanent majority in power, but a permanent hold on power.

    And people like that are contemptuous of voting.

    So they don't.

    Such people are looking for electoral disappointment as the trigger for what they really want: revolution.

    They just aren't admitting it to themselves, in sufficient numbers and self-honesty, that this is what they really want

    But it is difficult to reconcile the Republicans' rhetoric - and on-video violence against Democrats - with some blithe notion that the Party of Lincoln is still in existence. Or even the Party of Reagan.

    This Republican party is the Party of Rand.

    And it's all about the stomping.

    We are real and soulful, with heart and mind, feelings and flesh, thoughts and motives mixed and bright and dark all at once.

    by cskendrick on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:55:37 AM PDT

    •  They want to end government control of (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cskendrick, LillithMc, Neon Vincent

      business. The Republic will adapted to being a Corporate Entity.

      All aspects of government will become 'market driven' - in other words, just as in journalism where news was forced into becoming a 'profit center', government services will have to show a 'profit'.

      Try explaining health and education benefits for veterans, to begin with as part of a profit spreadsheet and work down each agency in turn to discover what Republicans truly want to do. Republicans are ready to throw veterans under the bus. Imagine what they are going to do with women, minorities, the elderly, the sick.

      •  National Underwriter had an article (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shpilk, basquebob, Neon Vincent

        in it, the leaders of the GOP House Caucus acknowledged, that "only or or two Republicans know even the slightest think about economics."

        Basically, the only GOPer with a clue about econ is Paul Ryan of Wisconsin. I think that's the name.

        The rest just take their cues from him...or whoever is feeding them a script.

        We are real and soulful, with heart and mind, feelings and flesh, thoughts and motives mixed and bright and dark all at once.

        by cskendrick on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 05:57:39 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Of course they hate vets. Most are minorities. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shpilk, Neon Vincent

        or poor. Or had the bad faith to go get hurt fighting to defend American lives and property.

        How dare they survive. Heroes are best when grave sites or statues or never found again.

        The more Amelia Earhearty, the better, Republicans say.

        We are real and soulful, with heart and mind, feelings and flesh, thoughts and motives mixed and bright and dark all at once.

        by cskendrick on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 05:58:58 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  This should be a separate diary. eom (0+ / 0-)

      "A time is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will trigger a revolution." -- Cézanne

      by toilpress on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 08:07:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Here Here (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    signals, FiredUpInCA

    To all of this.

    I feel Like I could have written this, but not as well.

  •  2 polls: Obama at 54% (15+ / 0-)

    YES, the Democrats are being systematically undercounted.

    The Newsweek poll and Marist poll both include cell-only voters.  The Democrats are leading in nearly all early voting states.

    We will NOT and I repeat NOT lose 53 seats in the House and 8 in the Senate.

    Furthermore, we could steal Alaska where Palin is self-destructing in her own back yard.

    We could also swipe LA and Kentucky.

    The polls are bunk.

    Vote out the DO-NOTHING Republicans 2010

    by GoogleBonhoeffer on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:00:36 AM PDT

    •  I hope to god those two polls are good (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      GoogleBonhoeffer, CKendall, toilpress

      And the rest of them - and there are so many of them - are indeed undercounting and underestimating us. My usual scan of the media outlets this morning left me with the same feeling I get when I've been out in a terrible storm. I came home to Kos, shook my umbrella, and started looking for a warm fire. I haven't found one yet, but you've given me a couple of embers.

      It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness - Eleanor Roosevelt

      by Fish in Illinois on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:11:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I very much hope that ordinary (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        GoogleBonhoeffer

        non-cell phone polling is skewed underestimating and unable to poll the new technology, including such novelties like restricting incoming calls, etc. which I use all the time. That leaves a huge chunk of the millennial electorate responsible for Obama's win in 2008.

        "A time is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will trigger a revolution." -- Cézanne

        by toilpress on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 08:19:00 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Not exactly true... (0+ / 0-)

      I'm not sure about Newsweek, but the Marist poll contained a sample of calls to RANDOM cell phone numbers (25% of those questioned). They weren't necessarily cell-ONLY voters. And it's hard to discern if they excluded cell phone calls to fit their pre-determined demographics in other categories because they did not include any mobile phone data other than a disclaimer.

      It's Health INSURANCE Reform, Not Health CARE Reform

      by HairyTrueMan on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:33:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  thanks nt (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, FiredUpInCA

    I voted, have you? If not please do.

    by OHknighty on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:02:50 AM PDT

  •  I think it's simpler than that (8+ / 0-)

    It's all about working backwards to justify selfishness. Trickle down economics is a perfect example. They concoct a scheme to funnel more to the wealthy, then they build an economic belief system (I won't call it a theory) around it. This is why the Republicans can't abandon it despite 30 years of failure. It is now a matter of faith, not economic reality.

    It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether I win or lose - Bill Walton

    by jhecht on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:02:53 AM PDT

    •  as someone raised with in an evangelical (5+ / 0-)

      church with "prosperity theology" used to justify acquiring wealth and feeling no real need to share despite all the Biblical teachings to the contrary(and yeah, I'm simplifying to make a point), this rings true to me, and probably to many who have tried to discuss social policies with someone and ended up wanting to shriek Matthew 25 verses in sheer frustration at the dissonance in the stated theology and the way it's being warped to justify whatever they really want to have happen.

      (Sadly, in Kathmandu no longer.)

      by American in Kathmandu on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 12:25:58 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  They feel irrelevant and ignored. So they act (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    toilpress, FiredUpInCA

    noisy and in-your-face. It's very complicated but the large numbers are (imho) b/c of the joblessness and a feeling of hopelessness. But there is racism in there to be sure.

    "Sir, you are a very clever man, but not very wise. Everyone knows it's turtles, all the way down."

    by hester on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:04:44 AM PDT

  •  AGAIN, You're Complicating Things (5+ / 0-)

    unnecessarily.

    with all due respect, it's the economy, stupid.

    and the worldview of the teabaggers/clownservatives is also very simple: The white, christian race is better than everyone else, deserves to be wealthy, and deserves government largesse to keep them wealthy.

    check the stats: the huge difference with this recession and recent recessions is white men of all ages who lost their jobs now find themselves jobless for a significantly longer period than ever before.

    in the past, women and minorities were the "first fired, last to be hired"... and that has been all OK with white men (see "worldview" above).

    but this time is different. the ax swung much more brutally and broadly and white guys are unable to get back to work.

    the coming backlash against Obama and the democrats is mostly due to white men being on the skids.

    had the planned/promised "recovery summer" occured this past summer-- had unemployment dropped to say, 6.5 percent, the democrats would be doing much better in this midterm.

    "I don't feel the change yet". Velma Hart

    by Superpole on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:12:10 AM PDT

    •  While male (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CKendall

      unemployment was 8.9 % in Sept., Black male unemployment was 17.3%. I'm not sure what increased % of  white male voters are on the skids, but the culture's racism and sexism does highlight their grievances, as you say.

      •  First Of All, Let's Stop With (0+ / 0-)

        the false "official" government unemployment numbers, OK?

        if we count people who are no longer seeking work, no longer getting benefits, the unemployment number is closer to 20 percent in many states.. in CA, I believe it's 22 percent. if we count people who have had their hours/pay cut or who are not working in their field, the number is way worse.

        so let's cut the nonsense about 8.9% or 9.6% unemployment.

        because the numbers are cooked, black male unemployment is also much, much higher than what is stated.

        even before the Great Recession, black male unemployment in NYC was OFF THE CHART:

        The CSSNY report paints a deeply unsettling picture. Senior Policy Analyst Mark Levitan found that almost half the city's black male population did not work in 2003. Only 51.8 percent of African-American men held jobs, compared to 75.7 percent of white men and 65.7 percent of Hispanic males.

        where do you suppose that number is now? seventy-five percent of black men in NYC unemployed?

        but this is all academic. our nation is not really about equal economic, education, health care opportunity/availability.

        the only question now is just how much longer can our system survive the obvious inequity and failure to deliver the goods?

        http://www.nycfuture.org/...

        "I don't feel the change yet". Velma Hart

        by Superpole on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 08:28:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Interesting (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Musial

      I hadn't thought about it in those terms, but I suspect you are right - do you have a good source on that?

      This is what chump Change looks like.

      by Wamsutta on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 12:32:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  White male (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shpilk, CherryTheTart

        at 8.9% as publicized by Jesse Jackson from official accounts. White male unemployment fits as an issue alongside the old opposition to affirmative action.

        •  Exactly... sadly (0+ / 0-)

          There is probably a frighteningly large subpopulation who think that white unemployment is part of a sinister plot by our Muslim commie black president to give all those old white jobs to his friends in the 'hood.

          Two years ago, I'd have thought that was black paranoia seeing a racist behind every tree, but now that the racists have all started standing in front of their trees, I realize now that I was mistaken. Good God, there are a lot of them, and they are absolutely fucking insane.

          Yes we can! The president, however, I'm not so sure about.

          by eodell on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:32:34 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  That is partially right. (0+ / 0-)

      There are simply a lot of formerly well off professional people (men and women) that lost their jobs, houses and entire life in the meltdown.

      Some are still out of work and have been for almost two years.

      Many of them in their 50's cannot find ANY kind of work, let alone something that would half way take them back to the nice lifestyle they once had.

      A lot of the unhappiness is directed at the president
      for bailing out wall street and not even ONE person going to jail for it.

      I disagree with a bunch of the things Obama has done or has not done that I think he should have.

      Then again, I would sooner not vote at all than vote for ANY tea bagger, or Republican.

      GOP motto "Mean and stupid hasn't worked, but it's what we know, so we're sticking to it."

      by Nebraskablue on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 03:41:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Core support group for thugs has always been (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      toilpress

      older white males .. always.

      This economic downturn supercharges that demographic to be pissed off.

      Motivations for non-whites and youth to vote for are not as clear, but the motivation to vote against is quite obvious, when one believes the lies of Limbaugh and Beck.

      It's what this cycle has come down to.

  •  Always love your stuff Spoon (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    martydd, ohmyheck, toilpress

    and today's diary is no exception.  Great reading!  Thanks!

    Poor Republicans. They are beginning to resemble the bar scene from Star Wars.
    - Peter Fenn

    by clinging to hope on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:13:23 AM PDT

  •  They want their imagined America back (8+ / 0-)

    The problem is that they are wrong as to what made America great and if they get their way they will ruin this country.

    We probably had 50 years of dominance remaining until financial deregulation, Bush's Presidency and now the election of 2010. I'd say that we have 10 good years left, if we are lucky. The right is fighting the very changes that America needs to be great again.

  •  The right is inundated with those who suffer from (8+ / 0-)

    acute cases of Precious Little Snowflake Syndrome.

    This is what happens when people are allowed to be coddled from the cradle to the grave.

    They hate to be reminded that what they really are is just another grain of sand on a huge beach, and just as susceptible to being washed out to sea as anyone else.

    •  Precious Little Snowflake Syndrome- (0+ / 0-)

      a White Precious Little Snowflake to be precise. ;)

      "A time is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will trigger a revolution." -- Cézanne

      by toilpress on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 08:25:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  "Coddled"? (0+ / 0-)

      This sounds kind of like a Republican complaining about "cradle-to-grave liberal socialism".  Get a job, you DFH!  etc. etc.

      The '60s were simply an attempt to get the 21st Century started early....Well, what are we waiting for? There's no deadline on a dream!

      by Panurge on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 09:01:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Dayum. Light.Bulb! (5+ / 0-)

    I wasn't quite sure what this dairy was about, until you got to the part about "What is no longer acceptable in polite society".

    This is brilliant!  Thank you.

    (mustponderthismustponderthimustponderthis.....)

    Where have all the mainstream Republicans gone? Apparently they're working for the Democrats in DC.---James Kresnik

    by ohmyheck on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:20:03 AM PDT

  •  the very fact that obama could get elected (7+ / 0-)

    is a sign that the old world is not longer in control. it's not just that a black guy with a foreign-sounding name is president, it's that a huge majority of the country voted to put him there.

    as a californian, it is very reminiscent of the wingnut freakout in the early to mid 90s, as the state was transitioning to majority-minority status. older relatives  kept trying to explain to me "we're going to be a minority" as if it was supposed to be terrifying, but it never made sense to someone who grew up in a diverse generation of californians. so what?

    surf putah, your friendly neighborhood central valley samizdat

    by wu ming on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:20:34 AM PDT

  •  And they were losers in high school (3+ / 0-)

    No seriously.  

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/...

    The more friends you had in high school the more likely you are to be liberal.  So be nice to everyone, as the retards you are a dck to will become the sociopaths working at a pipeline company funding global warming deniers.

    When we talk about war, we're really talking about peace.

    by genethefiend on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:25:32 AM PDT

    •  Uh, I was a loser in high school. (0+ / 0-)

      And the winners tended to turn into Republicans.  I suspect I'm a liberal because I was a loser in high school, and it distresses me to hear this sort of line from liberals.

      The '60s were simply an attempt to get the 21st Century started early....Well, what are we waiting for? There's no deadline on a dream!

      by Panurge on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 09:02:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  This is a kick-ass phrase (8+ / 0-)

    an ongoing migration of the perpetually petulant...

    "What about the headless bodies, Governor?" --- Members of the press yelling after a fleeing Jan Brewer, 9/1/2010

    by Pangloss on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:26:24 AM PDT

  •  Great diary, Thanks. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    nominalize, FiredUpInCA

    These are also people who don't follow political parties based on principals of the party, but follow who seems to be "winning". They don't like to back seeming losers, and with the media focus on the "TeaPartiers", they feel like they are backing winners.

    "There's so much there, Wolf, I don't know..." - Chris Coons 10/13/10

    by blueoregon on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:28:14 AM PDT

  •  I always thought (4+ / 0-)

    that the anger at having their [the privileged] status/worldview challenged is what fueled the whole anti-'political correctness' movement.

    These people just can't get past the fact that their notions are no longer routinely acceptable in all environments.

    The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

    by dfarrah on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:30:29 AM PDT

  •  I think it is time to file RICO charges (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CherryTheTart

    against Rethugs, Rove, CoC, etc, not just in Ohio but get Holder off his ass and file FED charges. If Holder won't do it, replace him.  We should have impeached Bush when we could. Faux could not hide all the things those crooks did in those eight years.  I blame Pelosi for taking it off the table.  The next DEM SoH (and there will be) needs to brake heads of all these DEM kittens (herding kittens is harder than herding cats). The next Rethug Pres will need to be treated by DEMs like Obama has been treated by Rethugs. This country is doomed if Rethugs keep this up. Corporations don't get it that you can't kill middle class and keep growing.

    "War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength", George Orwell, "1984" -7.63 -5.95

    by dangoch on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:31:25 AM PDT

  •  Earlier this year I met a rich white neurologist (13+ / 0-)

    and his doctor wife, and it wasn't long before I found out that they're both absolutely convinced that Obama is an Israel-hating Muslim socialist who's trying to destroy the US economy or at least turn it into a European socialist welfare state.

    Two well-educated doctors told me this. DOCTORS!

    They claimed to not be teabaggers, but to be sympathetic with them. Again with the reluctance to identify themselves too definitively with a movement that they were probably somewhat embarrassed by, even though they substantively agreed with it.

    There's definitely a certain pattern going on here. It has to do with white racism, white privilege, a sense of entitlement being violated, and a concern for their bottom line. I see similarities to the backlash of French aristocrats to the Revolution--mon dieu, you take away my snuff box!--and, really, of Loyalist colonial Tories who sided with the king in our own revolution. Every progressive era has its self-interested backlashers.

    Sucks for them, though. They'll have some short-term wins, but history is not on their side. Progress goes in one direction, and it's not the one they want it to go in.

    "Those who stand for nothing fall for anything...Mankind are forever destined to be the dupes of bold & cunning imposture" --Alexander Hamilton

    by kovie on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:36:57 AM PDT

    •  The educated and middle class are just as (6+ / 0-)

      uninformed as the so-called less educated and working class teabaggers we see on teevee.  I don't understand it.  I am AA and we grew up poor and most of the time on welfare.  My brother is a so-called christian and during the 2008 election he liked Palin and McCain?  He is a registered independent.  I think because of the shift of so many Dems voted for Reagan because of the "christian" values of the Republicans.  Now he is just anti-Obama because he is not "christian" enough for him.  He listens to right wing radio and repeats the talking points.  All I tell him to do is educate yourself, go to Fact-Check because they have no bias.  I told him about Palin and how as mayor she left the city in debt that they had to impose a sales tax for the first time.  I think he voted for Nader because his religious conscience could not let him vote for Obama. There are so many "one" issue voters still out there that will focus on the one issue they don't like and vote accordingly.  I met this latino guy while canvassing.  He was a first time democratic voter in 2008.  He is now voting republican.  I ask why and he said he likes them better.  He could not articulate why.  He liked Meg Whitman because she did a good job running Ebay.  I asked if he like the way Arnold ran California and he said no.  I explained that running a business is not like running a government and he said sorry I am just stuborn and that's who I am voting for.  I told him that after the election, watch who the Republicans give tax cuts to and what programs they cut and see if his taxes are cut, jobs are created and if he's able to go to college.  

      •  We're talking about two different types of (5+ / 0-)

        teabaggers. One is the kind that you're referring to, low-information, less-educated, less-affluent, unsophisticated political "drifters" (about whom the term "independant" is overly generous IMO, because it implies an active choice rather than a passive state) who vote--IF they vote--for whoever happens to appeal to them at the moment, based on their current life situation, prevailing political currents, and political PR. Many went for Dems in '06 & '08, now they're going for Repubs. Why? Because they're sheep, and do as they're manipulated to do, utterly clueless about their cluelessness.

        The other is the kind I'm referring to, well-educated, well-off, reasonably well-informed and intelligent, and voting largely based on perceived economic self-interest and a knd of paranoia having to do with a fear of losing what they have, not only materially, but physically, e.g. terrorism, crime, etc. These are people who are doing pretty well and want to keep it that way, and vote for candidates whom they believe are most likely to make that happen. They can also be manipulated, but with a more sophisticated brand of brainwashing. A very large percentage of teabaggers are this type.

        There's also social and cultural issue types, of course, the gun nuts, bible-thumpers, creationists, anti-abortionists, nativists, etc. But they've been around since the 50's, in one form or another. Put all three together, and they represent the majority of GOP voters today. And, this year, apparently the majority of voters, period. Sad. Dems were never going to get the third group, but they could have gotten a lot of the first two, and they messed that up, badly, due to bad politics and inadequate policy.

        "Those who stand for nothing fall for anything...Mankind are forever destined to be the dupes of bold & cunning imposture" --Alexander Hamilton

        by kovie on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:27:41 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Good job presenting this (4+ / 0-)

    I think you are on to something based on my anecdotal experiences with tea party-influenced relatives.

    A lot of the e-mails they forward to me are random screeds about how terrible it is that "they" don't want people saying the pledge of allegiance or that, thanks to this terrible calamity befalling our country, that you will be thrown in jail for mentioning God in a public place and other bullshit like that.

    I think this is evidence against the point of view that their complaints are mainly due to the bad economy.  As you point out, many of them are not all that bad off economically.  

    Plus, if the economy was really their main concern, whey would they be complaining so much about not enough people saying the pledge of allegiance and other issues completely unrelated to economic policy?

    I really do think that, even though things started going to hell in a handbasket under Bush, the tea party crowd were not outraged then because of the cultural affinity they felt towards Bush.  

    Of course, now that things are marginally better economically, taxes have been cut, etc. the outrage meter is pegged anyway because the President is not a white person and, futhermore, has had his cultural bona fides called into question by his opponents and the media establishment.

    "Why do we see the same old Republicans all over the news all the time when they were kicked out for screwing everything up?" - socratic's grandma

    by Michael James on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:42:27 AM PDT

  •  Average Americans get this same response... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mollyd, Willa Rogers

    ...from the banks, insurance companies, credit agencies, student loan processors, Fannie Mae, and party leaders:  

    And you know what?  I guess I'm supposed to try to understand these people.  I know a lot of them.  Some of them are close relatives.  But I really don't care to.  I don't care about their wounded pride, I don't care about their precious gated communities, and I don't care about their hurt sense of entitlement.  Frankly, my dear, I don't give a d***.  I just want to laugh in their faces and mock them.

    Mocking may be understandable but it's virtually never positive or even neutral, it's very very negative adding to the weight of problems and many people are repelled by it no matter who it's directed at.  

    "People need dramatic examples to shake them out of apathy," Bruce Wayne in Batman Begins.

    by kck on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:47:19 AM PDT

  •  I've run across this with religion (5+ / 0-)

    My friends who are very religious feel very strongly that their religion is under attack, that they are the minority, despite over 80% of America claiming to be Christian.

    "Whenever you have truth it must be given with love, or the message and the messenger will be rejected" ~Mahatma Gandhi

    by Kiku on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 11:58:27 AM PDT

    •  Their religion is under attack. (2+ / 0-)

      And deservedly so. Instead of doing some self examination and figuring out why, they make others wrong.

      I used to be Snow White. And then I drifted. - Mae West

      by CherryTheTart on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:20:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  And the funny thing is... (0+ / 0-)

      ... that in places dominated by liberals, religion is not under attack.  People just don't care, is all.  I  lived in bluest-blue Massachusetts for six years, and religion came up in conversation exactly zero times.  Nobody asked me what church I went to, or had a theological debate.  Nobody had a "Christians on Campus" t-shirt or whatever.  But the churches (and mosques, and synagogues, and temples) still functioned, because nobody was out to get them.

  •  why didn't clinton have this particular problem? (4+ / 0-)

    sure, they despised him (in part for his perceived race treachery) but why didn't they seem to care what he thought of them?

    Liberals are supposed to be the sensitive ones, but even the liberals who worked themselves into a froth over George W. Bush never really cared very much about what he thought of them. But conservatives care what President Obama thinks. They care to the point of imagining what he thinks...

    i don't know if they care what obama thinks so much as they hate him for thinking; for having the temerity, the education, and the intellect to judge them at all. he clearly doesn't know his place. and his place is definitely dictated by his color.

    don't settle for the lesser evil! vote for blanche lincoln!

    by output on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 12:06:23 PM PDT

    •  Clinton was folksy. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      output, CKendall, toilpress

      Barack Obama is elegant and reserved. And half black. Which of course translates to Black in America. They cannot handle the cognitive dissonance. Oh those Obamas, they just will not act Black.

      I used to be Snow White. And then I drifted. - Mae West

      by CherryTheTart on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:19:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Because in the past 15 years (0+ / 0-)

      the entire situation is VERY, very different----eceonomically, politcally, psychologically, you name it.

      It is comparing apples to oranges.  We will never know how Bill Clinton would have governed had he all these entrenched and systemic crises coming at him at once.

      And don't anybody tell me that is why Obama is being unfairly maligned. It is about his policies.  Period.

      Where have all the mainstream Republicans gone? Apparently they're working for the Democrats in DC.---James Kresnik

      by ohmyheck on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 02:09:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  agreed on this point, but (0+ / 0-)

        And don't anybody tell me that is why Obama is being unfairly maligned. It is about his policies.  Period.

        not on this one:

        the entire situation is VERY, very different----eceonomically, politcally, psychologically, you name it.

        It is comparing apples to oranges.  We will never know how Bill Clinton would have governed had he all these entrenched and systemic crises coming at him at once.

        i'm not talking about rational responses to policy decisions. i'm talking about teabagger resentment and the right wing's conveniently twisted definition of "the elite". in a country this that's racially . . . aware, no aspect of our politics or culture can be divorced from skin color. as i said before, clinton was touched by it to the extent that he was considered to be a race traitor because he wasn't palpably uncomfortable with blacks, and even counted some among his (no snark intended here) best friends.

        don't settle for the lesser evil! vote for blanche lincoln!

        by output on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 02:23:41 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  omh, you should know me better than this. (0+ / 0-)

        And don't anybody tell me that is why Obama is being unfairly maligned. It is about his policies.  Period.

        i am a vehement (and consequently, much hr-ed) critic of the president's policies. but that doesn't negate the fact that much of the opposition to him from the right, is race-based.

        don't settle for the lesser evil! vote for blanche lincoln!

        by output on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 02:26:31 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  What I know is, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          output

          that Centrists would be happy to jump all over my comment with their apologia-filled, "See, it isn't his fault!!! It is the horrible situation he inherited!!!!"  Blahblahblah......I am making sure that nobody even considers trying to pull that crap based on what I wrote.

          Not saying anything about racism.  Yes, racism is part of it, but after reading at DKos and Tim Wise diaries, I won't ever go there.  

          Where have all the mainstream Republicans gone? Apparently they're working for the Democrats in DC.---James Kresnik

          by ohmyheck on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 04:21:38 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  as if you could stop them. (0+ / 0-)

            I am making sure that nobody even considers trying to pull that crap based on what I wrote.

            you should know that, too.

            don't settle for the lesser evil! vote for blanche lincoln!

            by output on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 06:06:22 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Actually, I have managed to stop (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              output

              some of them.  I have absolutely had it with the Centrist BULLYING going on, and I called out one of the Main Bullies here, and she backed off.

              I have no idea what happened "behind the scenes"  (i.e.-she went and whined to MB and he sanctioned her instead) but I haven't seen her bullying the shit out of anyone here lately.

              So, ya, I'm done being bullied. I will not stand for it anymore.

              "Fuck With the Bull, You Get the Horn."

              Where have all the mainstream Republicans gone? Apparently they're working for the Democrats in DC.---James Kresnik

              by ohmyheck on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 10:36:15 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  i refuse to call them centrists. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ohmyheck

                they're corporatists; right of center, oligarchic kleptocrats.

                as for the bullies, they wouldn't bother coming after you if you weren't effective. you should consider it a compliment and let that spur you on. i am always glad to see your byline because you know your stuff, and you don't take any crap.

                as for mb, he sided with me once when i was shouted down by some numb-nuts, but other than that, all i get from him is a wag of the finger.

                a party that values emmanuel more than dean, geithner more than warren, and lincoln more than sanders deserves to get its butt kicked.

                by output on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 05:37:00 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Interesting, output. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  output

                  Good for you, for not calling them "Centrists".  I do so because it is DKos "politically correct".  Not because I don't believe with all of my fiber that they are truly how you describe, but I would, if I were being totally honest, call them "Fascist Authoritarians".  I would go into what that truly means, but you already know.

                  Thanks for the compliment!  Badabing calls me "The Truth-Teller" and I consider that a big compliment as well!

                  Hhhhmmmmmmmmmm.......I'm glad MB sided with you once, but not that he has wagged his finger at you since.  I'll be honest.  I've complained to him numerous times.  Always respectfully, and just the facts.  He has never wagged his finger at me.  He has replied a few times, always honestly, and mostly I never hear from him.  Which is fine with me.  I guess I should consider myself lucky.

                  Where have all the mainstream Republicans gone? Apparently they're working for the Democrats in DC.---James Kresnik

                  by ohmyheck on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 06:13:48 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  one of the finger-wags was because (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    ohmyheck

                    i called them "propagandists". i honestly believe that many (most?) of them are what someone here calls "Cass's Kids" because of this.

                    actually i hope that they are paid operatives because the notion that these people are simply brainwashed and/or irrational true believers is just too depressing.

                    a party that values emmanuel more than dean, geithner more than warren, and lincoln more than sanders deserves to get its butt kicked.

                    by output on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 06:49:37 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Um.....YIKES! (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      output

                      Nope, never seen that delightful work of art!

                      I've saved that one, it is long and tonight is faux-Halloween.  

                      But, who cannot wonder that some person on the other side of the comment is a paid operative?  I always do, but somehow it is not copacetic to make the claim.  So, I don't.  In truth, some are probably paid operatives, but plenty more are this:

                      http://members.shaw.ca/...

                      This be teh goldmine of understanding what the fuck is going on here, IMO.  Maybe you have already read it, I post it all the time, thanks to some smartypants Kossack who posted it first.

                      Yes, it is depressing.  I now just stick to the nuggets of gold here, and ignore the rest.  Just like I do in Real Life. What's that saying?  "Separating the wheat from the chaff"?

                      There are just too many gems among the rocks to blow this pop-stop, even after all these weeks of "Election Moratorium on Dissent" bullshit.

                      Where have all the mainstream Republicans gone? Apparently they're working for the Democrats in DC.---James Kresnik

                      by ohmyheck on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 08:24:42 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  i read john dean's book a while (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        ohmyheck

                        back. i find it hard to believe that there are this many authoritarian lefties. liberal politics, by definition requires a kind of inquisitiveness and open mindedness that would seem to be at odds with the authoritarian mindset.

                        yet they say that as many as 80% of americans are of the myers-briggs type that is predisposed to autoritarianism, so much as i hate to admit it, and  as sad as ut us fir democracy, you may be right.

                        i'll have to read altemeyer in full (i've already read excerpts) and re-read john dean's prescription for reaching those glassy-eyed masses.

                        a party that values emmanuel more than dean, geithner more than warren, and lincoln more than sanders deserves to get its butt kicked.

                        by output on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 09:52:46 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  I don't think people truly (0+ / 0-)

                          want to be "sheeple".  They are easily distracted by Elitists' ever-evolving attempts to confuse them.

                          They confuse them by exploiting their weaknesses, which are all profoundly subconciously-based, childhood-related security issues, the very mental bottom line. You see quite intellectually astute persons succumb to the neediness, instead of overcoming there issues and arriving at that place of "thinking clearly".  

                          How can one discuss any issue or policy with someone who has not woken up to their own "modus operandi"?  You can't. You can't awaken them to that fact either.  They are either ready, or they are not.  If they haven't figured themselves out, you are talking to a wall.

                          I have found a few who can actually "Think". "Thinking" is a radical ability.
                          But it is an ability that will surve nonetheless.

                          Where have all the mainstream Republicans gone? Apparently they're working for the Democrats in DC.---James Kresnik

                          by ohmyheck on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 10:13:50 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                      •  I think it just comes down to (0+ / 0-)

                        one simple thing.

                        There are those who just cannot, ever, accept that they were wrong.

                        If you cannot ever accept that you were wrong, you will spend an unending amount of time and energy into whatever it takes to prove yourself right.  

                        Facts matter not.  Being right is the end-all be-all.

                        I have been so wrong, so many times, that I let go of the nned to be right.

                        Now I just want to be happy.  Even if the facts suck.

                        Where have all the mainstream Republicans gone? Apparently they're working for the Democrats in DC.---James Kresnik

                        by ohmyheck on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 09:56:21 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

  •  It's the Stupid, Stupid (0+ / 0-)

    You can analyze it & crunch numbers all you want, but the truth is the majority of voters just don't care about facts and reality. I would feel better if they were all just a bunch of anti-abortion,Christian fundamentalist racists, but they aren't. They are mostly people who believe Obama  is responsible for the bad economy and putting even more conservative, anti-regulation Republicans back in power will make it better. This is not about the extreme on either side. People who think Obama is a Muslim born in Kenya did not vote for him in the first place. People who rant about "Obama care" taking away your freedom to see your own doctor, adding  "bad" regulations etc are idiots who apparently believe the insurance industry is more trustworthy and likely to provide better care at lower prices. I could go on about financial reform, "bailouts" etc, but what is the point, a majority of Americans are simply too easily mislead to put it kindly.

    Don't go blaming Fox News. CNN, and the media either. They may exploit the situation, but never has information been easier to find. If you believe Harry Reid's name shows up every time you try to vote for Sharon Angle than it is not the fault of Fox, you are an idiot.

    Personally I am just waiting to see how the voters who think the Republicans will make things all better will enjoy the next few years.

  •  THE answer is to create a new sense of winning (4+ / 0-)

    The sore winners  don't feel like winners for a reason. They know we're ALL losing, compared not with each other but with the rest of the world. We're  not  living the elegant, cosmopolitan life we see portrayed in Mad Men.  It's the Europeans and Asians who do -- the ones with the growing numbers of university-educated, who ride high-speed trains, who see more success in all fields of endeavor. We're all feeling a we;;-deserved sense of inferiority. If some of us feel like "sore winners' it's because they don't feel like winners -- not the way their parents' or grandparents' generation did.

    What's needed is the kind of investment and determination that can reverse our national decline -- that's howw to "fix" the Tea Party problem.

    Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

    by FischFry on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 12:21:18 PM PDT

    •  this is actually pretty good. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FischFry, ohmyheck

      The United States is an Empire in decline.  China is visibly outpacing up in the review mirror (and objects may be closer than they appear)

      China is to the US in 2010 very much what the US was to Europe in 1880.

      We have no desire to offend you -- unless you are a twit!

      by ScrewySquirrel on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:20:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  There is nothing different to me about the (5+ / 0-)

    tea party versus the red scare McCarthyites of the late 40s and early 50s. Same bullshit, different wrapper. This movement is nothing new in American politics. They just have a different branding, that's all. It has nothing to do with a new populist movement. It has to do with control. For the most part, white men fear they are losing power because an African American sits in the house of power over them. They don't like the women who they think perpetuate their reduction of power like Pelosi and Boxer. They love Angle and O'Donnell because they control their message. I am not a big Bill Maher fan but caught one of his shows a couple of weeks ago when he did his Bret Favre thing about white men and their penises. He was right on.

    Solitude is painful when one is young, but delightful when one is more mature...Einstein

    by tazz on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 12:24:42 PM PDT

  •  I think it's more than what you say (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LillithMc, CKendall, FiredUpInCA

    This is a very good diary, but I think there is another major factor contributing to the global dissatisfaction we are seeing.  People are just beginning to realize that there's no going back to the USA of the 60's and 70's and there is a general uneasiness bordering on panic among many as the realization hits home.

    The major difference between this depression and the depression of the 1930's is that the stock market is doing fairly well.  Corporate earnings are doing just fine, thank you.  The reason is that most of the Fortune 500 are multinational corporations.  If they need workers they can build factories and find employees overseas.  They can also find consumers for their products overseas, and this has gone generally unnoticed.  If the American consumer isn't buying for fear of unemployment, no big deal.

    Those hooked up with the major corporations are doing well, and they aren't necessarily the super rich.  As for the rest of us, we're either retired with a good pension, successfully self-employed, or hurting badly.  

    •  I'm with Reich... (0+ / 0-)

      People are angry because what they were promised by their own parents was a steadily improving life, with a better life for their children. And they don't see that it has happened.

      Of course, that hasn't materialized, since middle class incomes have held steady or declined over the past 30 years. Meanwhile personal debt has increased, education has deteriorated, and become more costly. The "you too can get rich if you work hard enough" rhetoric has not changed, so people feel responsible and like failures because despite all their hard work and playing by the rules, their incomes have not increased, and their lives are on the edge. All the risks and uncertainties have crashed upon the middle class.

      The structural nature of our economic and racial problems have not been clearly explained. Public intellectuals and our political leaders have the responsibility to do that. Instead, Beck and his Fox fellows have picked up the baton and are inflaming people, rather than offering ways to understand and policies that would help us cope with the structural changes.

      We are muddling our way through, and this election is evidence of the muddle.

    •  The global change (0+ / 0-)

      You are right Steve15.  I keep trying to fit together the global change with the mental breakdown in the US. The world is now functioning without us beyond our borders.  Part of our success overseas came from having military to back up our corporate ventures.  The Chamber of Commerce is an example of rats trying to survive a sinking ship.  Perhaps they think consolidating power and eliminating that pesky democracy will allow them entry to the new world order.

  •  If Nate is right... (0+ / 0-)

    and we see a majority in the House and end up with 51 to 52 Senators... How long before Ben Nelson, Joe Lieberman, and Mary Landrieu switch parties?

    "Trying to hold back the revision of history is always a good thing." -- Peter Christopherson

    by jethrock on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 12:35:16 PM PDT

  •  I read the title too fast... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z

    ... and thought it said "The Essence of the Whiplash"... but I guess if those numbers at the beginning of your diary are correct, I might not have been that far off.

  •  Uh, yea they are racists (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    citizen k, Matt Z

    I know several people who I know aren't really racists in the proper sense--or at least not as racist as most of the people around them.  But they feel themselves to be culturally part of the underprivileged, even though most of the them are fairly well-off.  These aren't people disaffected by the economy, nor are they the super-rich.  They call themselves moderates or independents.  But they have heavy a chip on their shoulder, and speak as if they want to express a political viewpoint that they can't really put into words.

    They cant put it into words because when they do, they sound racist, and they know it. Racist dont communicate in standard English, but use a series of symbolic codewords to communicate to other racists they are part of the group. When they talk to people outside this group, they seem incoherent because their racists code words have no meaning to non-racists.

    Expecting a racist to come clean about their racism to a non-racist is unrealistic, so asking them is useless.

  •  They're sore they can't do anything about the (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shpilk, CoExistNow

    shifting demographics.  They're sore they will no longer be the only dominant voting bloc in 2012.  So they demonize.  They divide.

    It is no longer my country, right or wrong.  It is simply my country....& it better go the way they want.  Or else.....the 2nd Amendment option is on the table.  

    •  Indeed, there's some realization in the back (0+ / 0-)

      of their minds that their 'Ozzie and Harriet' world is slipping away, forever.

      They are so desperate to hold onto that, they lash out as they are fed lies they swallow whole from corporate right wing media.

  •  I think it's more complicated... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Steve15, jennylind, ohmyheck, peregrinus

    if the GOP scores a huge win (and I'm still unconvinced, Nate's record notwithsatnding) they will not have won on tea party votes alone. alas.

    The NY times reported just this week that elements fracturing from Obama's winning coalition include the poor, women and latinos along with many from the unemployed working classworking class that, imho, don't easily fit into your charcaterization.

    I do think you articulate extremely well that part of the disaffected that can be called tea partiers but it's just a part of the coalition that will turn the Democrats out, if they are going to lose...

    which, again, I'm not so sure of.

    Here's another view, from a longer range point of view and with an eye on the Democratic party over the past 30 years or so: The World Liberal Opportunists Made

    It's NOT a comfortable read but I think it gets some things right and when it does the truth hurts.

    The death of the liberal class, however, is catastrophic for our democracy. It means there is no longer any check to a corporate apparatus designed to further enrich the power elite. It means we cannot halt the plundering of the nation by Wall Street speculators and corporations. An ineffectual liberal class, in short, means there is no hope, however remote, of a correction or a reversal through the political system and electoral politics. The liberals’ disintegration ensures that the frustration and anger among the working and the middle class will find expression in a rejection of traditional liberal institutions and the civilities of a liberal democracy. The very forces that co-opted the liberal class and are responsible for the impoverishment of the state will, ironically, reap benefits from the collapse. These corporate manipulators are busy channeling rage away from the corporate and military forces hollowing out the nation from the inside and are turning that anger toward the weak remnants of liberalism. It does not help our cause that liberals indeed turned their backs on the working and middle class.

    "History is a tragedy, not a melodrama." - I.F.Stone

    by bigchin on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:06:44 PM PDT

    •  Yes, and the crisis in the EU isn't helpful (0+ / 0-)

      We used to be able to point to France and the UK as examples of good universal health care.  Now, the financial crisis brought about in the EU by bank speculation as it was here threatens that.  Notice how it's unacceptable for Obama to blame the banks for our mess, but instead he must focus the blame on the Republicans.  People paying attention know that's not where the responsibility lies.

      •  the Republicans (0+ / 0-)

        were in power and turned away while the banks were running amok, so to speak.

        The banks did it, the Republicans enabled it, and it's the Republicans we can elect or toss out, not the banks...

  •  They're sociopaths (0+ / 0-)

    Ive unfortunately aquired a couple as friends.

    Why the need to rationalise so much?

    They have a view based on pure avarice, self interest. They mimic feelings for others as our society harshly punishes those who dont.

    And Jesus said to his disciples, "Truly, I say to you, it will be hard for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven.

    by cdreid on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:12:58 PM PDT

  •  Bigots and fools ... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shpilk

    ... that's all they are and to provide them with a cover any more complex than the simple truth is to enable them. The right today is a haven and a draw for virulent racists, violent sociopaths and those afflicted with authoritarian personality disorders.

    And morons.

    Lots of morons.

    Period.

  •  When I first read the article, as a girl from (4+ / 0-)

    Ohio who has lived below the Mason Dixon line for 20 some years, the following sums it up:

    I get the same feeling listening to them that I've gotten living in the South and listening to Southerners tell me about Yankees and the War of Northern Aggression. Well, although I've lived in the South nearly 30 years I'm a Yankee born and raised, and I can tell you with reasonable authority that no one in North thinks or talks about the Civil War. Nor do they talk about SEC football. Nor do they worry about what Southerners think of them, whereas I've heard many Southerners explain the football prowess of SEC schools in terms of self-esteem — i.e., that success on the football field is what allows Southerners to feel they're "just as good" as everyone else, even though everyone else is blessedly unaware of the outcome of the Iron Bowl, or even where it's played.

    Never kick a fresh turd on a hot day. Harry Truman

    by temptxan on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:21:23 PM PDT

  •  Your own lie (0+ / 0-)

    I reject a part of your thesis:

    I just want to laugh in their faces and mock them.

    See, you DO "give a damn."  If you were REALLY indifferent to them, you wouldn't even want to mock them.  You wouldn't bother.

    If you just wanted to get their hands off the levers of power, that's one thing.  But if you want to convince them that they are wrong wrong wrong (and they are), don't try to say "I don't give a damn."  Because you do.

  •  Spot on (7+ / 0-)

    In the end, the sense of grievance boils down to anger that their worldview is no longer considered acceptable in polite society.

    I ran into something like this recently. An acquaintance kept starting long and increasingly racist debates with me on Facebook. These went on longer than they should have because I've been trying to take a less combative stance in my dealings with low-information reactionaries lately, hoping that I can get through to one or two of them.

    After a couple of weeks of this, the things he was saying went from being mildly to extremely ugly, and it was plain that he was so deep into either Rush Limbaugh or Glenn Beck that there was no point in continuing. More importantly, it was personally embarrassing for me to even be talking to him and having his racist rants on my wall. So I unfriended him and apologized to anyone who had been exposed to his crap.

    This lead to a private email exchange in which he started by accusing me of censorship (much as NPRs later firing of Juan Williams has led to similar nonsensical accusations on a larger scale). I explained that it wasn't censorship any more than prohibiting him from scrawling graffiti on my house was censorship, and, more importantly, that it was embarrassing to be associated with someone who was saying the things that he said, and I didn't want anyone to think that I tolerated, much less agreed with, that garbage.

    He responded by saying that he didn't think that was a reasonable concern, since I had stood my ground and opposed his arguments. Which completely missed the point, which is this: Decent people don't hold racist views, nor do they associate with those who do. It's not an acceptable difference of opinion, it's a serious, unforgivable flaw. Being a racist (or any other kind of bigot) doesn't mean we have a reasonable difference of opinions, it means that you're a bad person. One of the worst kinds, in fact, short of being a violent criminal.

    I can see where they wouldn't like that. The weird thing is, as with this guy, that a lot of them just don't get it.

    Yes we can! The president, however, I'm not so sure about.

    by eodell on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:23:15 PM PDT

  •  I prefer to call them "Crypto-racists" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ohmyheck, toilpress

    If I could think of a less academic-sounding term, I'd use it, but this is what it is.

    When you say "racism" to a Tea Puppet, they think you're talking about old-time segregation, and (most of them) are perplexed and surprised that we would equate them to  and George Wallace and Sheriff Bull Conner.

    They fully understand that their parents' generation lost the civil rights battle. They understand that American society is now, and will remain, racially integrated.

    But they believe that they have a personal, constitutional right not to participate in this society. They feel that they are exercising that right when they say their taxes are too high, when they oppose affirmative action in the workplace, and when they demand vouchers to pay for their kid's private (segregated) education.

    They feel and act like a threatened minority because they've been trying for a generation to create in "separate but equal" lives for themselves in social and religious enclaves.

    That's why they wear the "spirit of '76" as their mantle and wave "don't tread on me" flags. They truly are in rebellion against the new Multicultural America.

    Crypto-racism spills out sideways into all kinds of bizarre beliefs and behavior. They've been ruthlessly exploited by RepubliCorp, and that's why we get "Obama=Hitler" signs at demonstrations.

    Politicians who promise LESS government only deliver BAD government.

    by jjohnjj on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:24:23 PM PDT

    •  Ah .. good times .. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      basquebob, congenitalefty

    •  Crypto-racism to me is just plain racism- (0+ / 0-)

      as I was born in the seventies and The Jim Crow era to me is pre -history, inconceivable to have existed at all. I cannot understand the thinking at all.
      To the Tea Puppets, anything short of segregation is normal and polite, in their impolite rough society. But to us, it's just as crude and immoral if not more than segregation.
      The rest of the Tea Puppet behavior is a total mystery to me. I don't understand the Don't Tread on Me posters, and the rest of those slogans. They scare me.

      "A time is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will trigger a revolution." -- Cézanne

      by toilpress on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 08:59:59 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  "Given a choice between a Republican... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ohmyheck, MixedContent

    ...and someone who acts like a Republican, people will vote for the real Republican all the time."

    Those words were true when Harry S Truman said them and they are true today. We have the most corporate-friendly Democratic president ever and the most corporate-friendly Democratic Congress ever.

    People are going to vote for the real Republicans instead of the fake ones. It's really that simple.

    Barack Obama: Ignores his legal obligation to prosecute people who tortured prisoners to death. Good at photo ops, though.

    by expatjourno on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 01:28:08 PM PDT

  •  Drinking Game for election night should be:Each (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ohmyheck, congenitalefty

    time media has to say "This is an unecpected result, for the polls said blah, blah, blah."  I'm willing to bet this is said much more frequently than we imagine..

  •  Fascinating analysis...last night (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fisheye, ohmyheck

    I was pondering the notion that their woldview was physically dying, so it's especially interesting to read it here and with more coherent descriptions of genesis.

    I don't know about the assertion that they care more about what Obama thinks about them than we cared about Bush thinks about us. I can't confirm or deny that assertion and I'm not sure how to verify it.

    •  Well I think there is a practical and emotional (0+ / 0-)

      distinction to see there. The tea party has an irrational emotional platform that doesn't conform to reality; exemplified in such beliefs as Obama raised taxes and wild misconceptions of the constitution. What is it they are really reacting too in a violent way.

      What Bushco thought of most of the electorate translated into very real and lasting detrimental consequences. It's quite clear and easily articulated what caused our anger with them.

      Obama disparaged the validity of some Americans fears by questioning the meaningfulness of gun fetishes and religious fundamentalism. BushCo endorsed and inflamed those fears at every opportunity...

  •  Tipped, wrecked and hotlisted ! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ohmyheck, toilpress

    The Money Quote:

    the sense of grievance boils down to anger that their worldview is no longer considered acceptable in polite society.

    Or acceptable in civil society.

    So....they're mad that they can't use the n-word even in private anymore. Their kids or friends will call em' out on it. And rightly so.

  •  I don't buy this one. It isn't 'sore winnerdom', (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    thereisnospoon, melpomene1

    it is spoiled bratiness.  You have an entire generation that grew up in a propserous and strong america that was taught that this all 'just happened' because of the free market:

    "No one had to fight for any of this.  The civil rights protesters were really making much ado about nothing.  The free market did a better job of liberating blacks than MLK ever did.  The vietnam war protesters were cowards trying to dodge their civic responsibilities.  The free market delivered everything that made america great, and the only threat to america is unions and liberalism which attempts to destroy the free market.  So quit fretting over economic policy and let the free market do its thing.  Good stuff just happens and it will happen to you if liberals don't get in the way"

    This is the line of crap my generation was fed and most still believe.  They expect things to just happen, and when things don't turn out they get pissed.

    The business corallary is a company where none of the management understands the products they sell and they fire their development team because, well, the products have always been here and always will.  Then the whole place falls apart (which is also why you don't have manufacturing in america anymore).

  •  Bush Junior put a Turd in Obama's Pocket. (5+ / 0-)

    Recall how Bush Senior committed troops to Somalia -- after he had been defeated by Bill Clinton back in 1992? And that whole Blackhawk Down crap ensured? Set the next president back, give him a smelly gift to handle, as you go out the door.

    It is the Bush way.

    Junior ran this country into the ditch, as President Obama often says. And that is all too true. Look who is getting blamed for it all? President Obama.

    If I were running for election as a DEM, I'd have that video of Junior's panicky speech when he announced that the American taxpayers had to bailout the banks. His little lips trembled, his eyes were wide, he was confessing to us all that his entire program was a failure and a waste, right? Play that tape for those voters who don't seem to have any memory at all.

    Greenspan admits his free market faith was "a mistake" - Reliance on self interest creates a flaw "in how the world works."

    by Otherday on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 02:07:38 PM PDT

  •  Loads of them are also old, white RACISTS. An (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    basquebob, Rosita, toilpress

    old widow who lived across the street from me in my upscale neighborhood of L.A. told her liberal son, pointing at my Obama HOPE poster in the window on the day he won the election, "No black man will ever be my president."

    She was right.  She died before he took his oath of office.

    Old, white, priviledged and RACIST.

    Period.

    Fox News + Saudi Prince = Propaganda Promoting Sedition

    by Little Lulu on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 02:23:33 PM PDT

  •  Growing up (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jjohnjj, congenitalefty
    As a white suburbanite with a blend of ethnicity that equaled mostly nothing culturally was always kind of a sore spot. I was a little jealous of people that could claim to be part of a group. In my neighborhood that amounted to a minuscule percentage of people.  Even my relatives with a small nugget of heritage were far flung and didn't amount to much. After I married into a family with a 'heritage' that included a cultural identity I realized it was something I would have liked and did in fact miss. The sense of belonging to some defined group is what has changed. Each ethnic group has lost it's identity as time has passed.

    This is one reason  why I think 'white' America is angry. They are culturally bereft.  When you feel like you are on the outside looking in it can breed anger. The black and hispanic communities haven't lost their culture yet. They can proudly form groups that just by there very name shut out 'white' America. Would society accept a National Organization for the Advancement of White People? Of course not. (Besides the fact there is no need)

    Now before you get all upset, I am not advocating any such thing or in any way against organizations that are culturally or ethnically based. In fact there are 'white' organizations, Churches and the Republican party are two examples. Since they can't keep others out, they try to find ways to make it uncomfortable for those who don't fit in. It is also why they are fiercely loyal to those groups. Many people don't realize that is their motivation and would be shocked if you called them out for it.

    So just my perspective...

    Loyalty to petrified opinion never yet broke a chain or freed a human soul in this world--and never will. Mark Twain

    by whoknu on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 02:48:56 PM PDT

  •  their world view is dying & they'd like to take (0+ / 0-)

    the planet down with it.

    Whatever action a great man performs, common men follow. And whatever standards he sets by exemplary acts, all the world pursues. The Gita 3.21

    by rasbobbo on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 02:51:52 PM PDT

  •  yes, anger is their hallmark (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aliasalias

    and until now, I have never been able to understand their anger.

    They have most of the money, but they are just FURIOUS. They have all the power, but act like they are victims? Why???

    They were furious - all the time - even when they had all 3 branches of government!!!

    Then they were furious after being thrown out of power for doing such an unbelievably crappy job. A normal person would think, yep, we did a totally crappy job, no wonder they booted out ass out.  But no, these people just got angrier, acted even more like victims.

    We cut taxes, they're still apoplectic.

    This explains it. Thank you.

    Thank God their days are numbered. They are truly making everyone's lives miserable on the way out.

  •  Straussians vs. Randites (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fisheye, Neon Vincent

    They both think that the world on works because of the skills of a few elites. But only the Straussians care what the non-elites think about them (to the point where they justify their lies to them as "for their own good.") Randites simply don't care. They just want the idiots to get out of their way.

    I'll take an honest Randite to a well-meaning Straussian any day.

    •  I think I must agree that the one who actually (0+ / 0-)

      believes in the virtue of his ego is more dangerous.

      Funny that both must do through such extreme volumes of verbiage to arrive at the same conclusions. As if the weight of their words could be measured in ink.

  •  I'm beyond caring as well (0+ / 0-)

    There was a time where I wanted to treat everyone's concerns as worthy of discussion. But now, listening to these yahoos, all I can say is fuck that shit. I've spent half my life trying to be caring and understanding and have the yahoos gotten any less yahooish? Not in the least.

    I'll be damned if I'm going to waste the 2nd half of my life trying to be sympathetic to the concerns of selfish ingrates.

  •  Dumb as conservative stereotyping of liberals (0+ / 0-)

    That's right, you heard me. This analysis is just another person who thinks they are smart, being really, really stupid and engaging in stereotypes they don't understand.

    According to conservatives, rich people behind gates are all liberals and now according to to this analysis it's conservatives and liberatarians. Oh goodie we are learning a lot.

    Poor to medium wealthy people make up the majority of both parties. The upper ranks of both parties are filled with rich people, ok?

    So can we get some analysis that is actually worth something? Oh yes and racism and gender hatred or any other convenient negative stereotyping fill both parties, tribal bias is part of our human makeup, and if the current author's write-up doesn't demonstrate that, nothing will.

    •  I think the "sore winners" label (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      basquebob, cacamp, Neon Vincent

      ...fits the folks who are dropping loads of cash for Republicans.

      I don't think that the Democratic wealthy can be labeled as "sore winners".

      It is not the majority of both parties that is driving the narrative in this election, however.  Big money and big media are.  We will see November 2 what the true narrative is.

      If you think that racism is just "tribal bias", you are very much mistaken.  No more than homophobia is "tribal bias".

      50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

      by TarheelDem on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 03:55:36 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  What 'conservatives'? (4+ / 0-)

      There are few 'conservatives' on the right wing in this country.

      Almost all of what the right wing has to offer now is greed: they've poisoned the public with racism, sexism, bigotry to accomplish a stampede towards what they call 'conservatism', but it's just cover for keeping wealthy people wealthy by destroying government. The never ending War on Terra is a part of that, used to instill fear in the electorate, as needed.

      That's not conservatism as I grew up understanding it. That's destroying government, in order to create a corporate run society.  

    •  wow, you got some hate to pour out (0+ / 0-)

      plenty of folks disagree here but you just jump right to the name calling without so much as a thought in your head.

  •  A half billion dollars (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Tanya, zaka1

    ...says that those with money are afraid that progressive policies are winning with the folks that have been supporting their Republican buddies.

    Democrats are not losing this election because of Tea Party turnout.  Tea Party turnout is not occurring in all races.  There are other reasons.

    But the "sore winners" label sure applies to the folks dropping bundles of money to avoid taxes.  Think about it.  Meg Whitman is dropping $150 million.  To avoid California taxes.  In a state whose major fiscal problem is revenue.  She could have totally encased herself in diamonds set in platinum for less.  Buying a political office has become the ultimate luxury.

    50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

    by TarheelDem on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 03:50:46 PM PDT

  •  unfortunately with 2 years to mess with they can (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Tanya

    do what Fox news is doing for Glenn Beck, put up buffets so deep and so strong it's doesn't matter if their world view dies away ... through the proxy of the system they've created, it will live on

    Bumper sticker seen on I-95; "Stop Socialism" my response: "Don't like socialism? GET OFF the Interstate highway!"

    by Clytemnestra on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 04:17:39 PM PDT

  •  You are so right, thereisnospoon! A good example (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cacamp

    of this was a man on Anderson Cooper's show last night. He was some elected School board member from Arkansas I believe, who was on apologizing, explaining, why he had written on Facebook some horrid comments regarding teens committing suicide because they were bullied for being gay.

    Apparently he said something equivalent to they did the right thing. He even said if his kids turned out to be gay he would drive them from his home. Etc. He'd had to move his family out of state temporarily due to death threats, he said, people expressed such rage toward him.

    But he felt constrained to quit his position (from which he could not be fired), and apologize. UP TO A POINT. Then things fell apart. When he didn't stay on script saying how he'd done the wrong thing by making such statements. Asked, for instance, would he still do that to his own kids if they were gay, would he throw them out?

    He answered, well that's a long time off. I have beliefs.

    It was weird. One of the strangest interviews ever, and he reminds me of the kind of person you are speaking of here. I also have some relatives I think feel this way.

    Our unemployment crisis could be cured very quickly if we had the intellectual clarity and political will to act. ~ Paul Krugman

    by Gorette on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 04:21:37 PM PDT

  •  To pretend most aren't racists, they aren't (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    citizen k

    sexist, they are not religious bigots, they aren't greedy is to deny the very core of the value set that defines today's right wingers.

    The other factors which play a role are the fear factor, which is pounded into the heads of every American since 9/11. This of course dovetails with the racism.

    What I detect from the middle class working people who "identify" with Teabaggers is that they view blacks, Latinos and anyone like them as competitors for an ever decreasing piece of an economic pie.

    What they fail to grasp is that the massive amounts of wealth [tens of trillions since the 1980s] that has been shifted from the middle class to the ultra wealthy is the reason why they feel they are being cheated. It's easy to blame the Spanish speaking brown people or black people because you can't find a decent job, if you listen to the lies of Limbaugh and Beck 24/7/365.

    •  the main reason these arguments work is because (0+ / 0-)

      there is no serious party in this country articulating an alternative economic view.

      To sin by silence when they should protest makes cowards of men~~ Abraham Lincoln

      by Tanya on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 07:59:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  To those who feel this could have waited til Weds (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    basquebob, toilpress

    Mea culpa!  

    This diarist is one of the hardest working politicos I know.  He has been working non-stop this election cycle.  When he posted the Esquire article to our local discussion group with his commentary, I reminded him that he is a political blogger and that he should share his insight with the world! True to his nature and superhuman powers he found the time to turn this into a post on DK.  If he could find the time to write it we can take the time to read it.  

    Now get back to electing great Democrats!

    When Dick Cheney has a better position on marriage than the Democratic president, you know we're not asking for nearly enough.

    by GayDemInRedDistrict on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 05:46:23 PM PDT

  •  just plain stupid (0+ / 0-)

    i dont have time to read more.

    the american pie is shrinking. what are the anxiety phrases thrown by the teaparty?

    "redistribution of wealth"

    "socialism" (giving breaks to lower income groups)

    "illegal immigrants taking our jobs"

    "making our children indebted"

    dailykos is going to have two years to do better than this.

  •  I know these people. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fisheye
  •  Ohh... this is so true: (0+ / 0-)

    "A time is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will trigger a revolution." -- Cézanne

    by toilpress on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 06:14:25 PM PDT

    •  oops- hitting enter twice sends the comments out! (0+ / 0-)

      Published it by mistake (my excitement about this diary is apparent now).
      Thereisnospoon, you put into words what's been on my mind for such a long time. It is all about the generation gap, not the damn enthusiasm gap. It's been that all along since the Obama election.
      You've said it so well:

      In the end, the sense of grievance boils down to anger that their worldview is no longer considered acceptable in polite society.

      And I feel exactly the same way. I don't give a damn about those people, I just want to mock them, and ridicule their outdated twisted world views.

      "A time is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will trigger a revolution." -- Cézanne

      by toilpress on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 06:19:48 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  did you see Maddow in alaska (0+ / 0-)

        interviewing miller supporters? most of them were very young, younger than my thirtysomething daughter.

        To sin by silence when they should protest makes cowards of men~~ Abraham Lincoln

        by Tanya on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 07:53:38 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Sure can't disagree but (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925, amk for obama

    Most Tea Baggers certainly aren't "sore winners" - by a long shot. Just read the above-referenced Matt Taibbi Rolling Stone piece about a Palin Tea Bag rally attended by swarms of people in Medicare supplied, motorized wheel chairs.

    These are the ones we've often wondered about here - The poor Republicans who inexplicably vote against their own interests.

    After reading that Taibbi/Rolling Stone piece on the Tea Baggers who'd lived off the government all their lives... but were there to protest others living off the government all of their lives, well, it just underscored for me that a huge schism is developing in the Republican party and the Tea Baggers are half of it and again, they're hardly "sore winners".

    I think the other half though is most definitely described well by this diary and "sore winner" is a great way to put it.

    The question becomes what will happen when these two very disparate groups go to the polls. We've already seen quite a few Republicans who, just a year ago, would've been thought sure-fire political winners getting knocked off their thrones by some upstart Tea Bagger.

    I'm hoping this will work to our advantage in the long run.

    This ain't no party. This ain't no disco. This ain't no foolin' around!

    by Snud on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 06:17:12 PM PDT

  •  stop the psych 101 and listen to the fuckng radio (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    citizen k, Tanya

    limbaugh and sons tell them what's going on and many have no alternative political input, whether by choice or because there are no other alts for politics while driving or working, and they react, and the left, who never listen to the 1000 radio stations because it gives them a headache, analyze as if their local right wing radio stations blasting the talking points and lying about their causes and chosen candidates to 50 million every week, a crowd the size of the one that voted for obama, and which are very well coordinated, don't even exist.

    how much more thought and effort willl be wasted in the years to come by the left because they'd rather plug in a CD than hear the main source for their opposition and their opponents most effective weapon as it jams their causes and candidates in the back.

    Progressives will lose all major messaging battles until they picket the limbaugh/hannity megastations and boycott those stations' local sponsors.

    by certainot on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 06:28:48 PM PDT

    •  PS (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      citizen k

      i direct this to ALL left analysts who keep missing the problem in their own neighborhood. i like your analysis except for the missing part.

      the loudest station by far in my state, the one that gains credibility by doing some local programming and the college football is singlehandedly going to turn numerous offices over to republicans after being wrong about everything during the 8 years of bush, merely because they are the loudest soapbox in the state and no orgs or groups deems it appropriate to challenge them.

      Progressives will lose all major messaging battles until they picket the limbaugh/hannity megastations and boycott those stations' local sponsors.

      by certainot on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 06:36:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  PPS their motivations are irrelevant- where are (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      citizen k

      they getting their 'facts'?

      they spout teh exact same talking points- they are primarily dittoheads who came out of the limbaugh dumb-down closet to defeat the public option and kept going from there..

      Progressives will lose all major messaging battles until they picket the limbaugh/hannity megastations and boycott those stations' local sponsors.

      by certainot on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 07:10:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  With all the gerrymandering (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    amk for obama, congenitalefty

    2010 was always going to be tough especially in the house. The republicans were in power for a long time and curved up districts in a way that favors them.

    No gerrymandering in presidential elections so no tea bagger candidate could possibly get to 270.

    They will get more outraged when Obama blows them out again in 2012 despite the bad economy and all

  •  Oddly enough... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925, congenitalefty

    ...the Republicans seemed to have no problem whatsoever adopting an "opposition" mode immediately after the Democratic tsunami of 2008 and, with the help of a corrupt bought-off-and-paid for U.S. Supreme Court that has open the floodgates of unlimited corporate spending on elections, just two years later, despite that the Republicans caused ALL of the problems that the Republicans are now protesting...they are on the verge of a major comeback. Just two short years later.

    When the Republican'ts barely squeaked into office in 2000, barely holding onto the House and Senate and stealing the presidency, with the help of the owned-bought-and-paid-for U.S. Supreme Court...the Democrats...virtually went into hiding. It took six years for the Democrats to mount any resemblance to an "opposition" party, which only came when the blatant incompetence and mismanagement by Republicans could no longer be ignored even by their co-conspirators in the Republican-owned news media.

    So...Republicans, with the help of massive amounts of money from billionaires and corporations and in-kind contributions from the national news media propaganda machine....are on the verge of staging some kind of comeback (hopefully...we can keep it to a modest one and can exceed expectations) after just two years after their failures nearly destroyed this country economically. What a bizarre country we live in.

  •  One size fits all explanations are flawed (0+ / 0-)

    First off, some folks who more or less identify with the TP ethos fit this "sore winners" template. Heck, I know one or two people who exemplify this type.

    But, political groups are always diversified and saying that this single tendency explains the TP movement is politically and sociologically an egregious over simplification.

    Let's not forget that the TP is one part a PR rebranding of the Republican Party, which had pretty disgraced itself on the national stage. Many of the core TP people used to be called the Republican base- a mix of Christian conservatives, pro-lifers, libertarians, wealthy plutocrats, gun nuts, white supremacists, bigots convinced that immigrants and minorities are taking away their economic opportunities, etc.

    The TP brand has sparked a lot of energy that is also attracted more peripheral members who are generally disgruntled and have a place to channel their frustrations. These folks fit the Tom Frank's what is wrong with Kansas model.

    The real significance of the TP is giving some kind of populist sheen and credibility to the usual suspect Republican candidates. And this faux-populist, outsider image is drawing in the so-called independents or swing voters (or what feel is the more accurate appellation - low information voters).  

  •  you know, if you've got them angry... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925, lisastar

    then the notion that some ideas are simply unacceptable in polite society is sinking in.

    Is this progress? Perhaps, and some will get it. However, as long as Murdoch and crew are out there creating communities of these ideas, as long as Palin, Malkin, Bachman, Boehner, DeMint, and all of them feel this is a voice they want to encourage in the national debate, then we can forget about that progress. These people legitimize all of it.

    It may be the GOP's biggest problem that they came to realize, after Iraq, just how empty their ideological aims were. So they decided to embrace this madness called the tea party. I noticed long ago how amorphous the right is. It's a mixture partly of racists, tax revolters, those supposedly standing up for ill-defined "liberties," religious zealots, etc. The right is a coalition of all these, practically none of whom realize that they're only tools, funded by cutthroat, free-market jihadists.

    What's missing from tea baggetry is any notion whatsoever of responsibility and citizenship. Those things that make freedom possible and distinguish it from anarchy.

    Good post, thanks.

    We need to be STRONG because Obama is not.

    by papicek on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 07:46:28 PM PDT

  •  "...perpetually petulant." (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925, lisastar, satanicpanic

    Perfect.  These folks will not be happy, whether their candidates get elected or not.  They have been conditioned to be unhappy and, by gosh, that's what they're going to be!  To be fair, they are very good at it.

    I was just talking to my conservative sister about how I long for the good old days when the Soviet Union gave us all an enemy to despise.  Without that, Americans have turned on each other, especially those whose ethnicity is un-white.  That particular thing never affected me until 9/11.  As a second gen American of Lebanese descent, I realized quickly that my American-ness was in question, even though I have only once set foot outside this country for a 24-hours side trip to Canada and my Arabic skills are limited to a few nouns and cuss words.

    -7.62, -7.28 "Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly." -Langston Hughes

    by luckylizard on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 08:15:06 PM PDT

  •  Fault, dear Brutus is in our Dems not our TeaBags (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lisastar

    The right wing GOP fringe will always will be with us, they are not why the Democrats are getting booted out of Congress.

    The reason is Democrats mad at Democrats for failing to do the job, for failing to TRY to do the job. If Democrats were enthusiastic about Dems as GOP is about GOP, we'd be in good shape.

    There was so much promise in 2008 of change, everyone was for it and that's how they voted and we got burned badly by no change, by Obama and Congressional Democrats not even TRYING to change.  On every issue from health care to bailout to Wall St to equal rights (DADT) to civil rights (Guantanamo, torture, domestic spying) to war (the Afghan and Iraq Wikileaks contrasted to Obama's $1T per year military surge) to climate change.

    If those who voted Democratic in 2008 thought the Democrats were TRYING to change, they'd be backing them and we'd hold Congress but many of us feel we got burned. The hard core will still vote Democratic but the soft core will not vote or vote for anybody but to send an angry message.

    That is why Democrats are losing Congress. Because they didn't stand up for what they campaigned on, because hopes were raised and the blow back is a bitch.

    If Silver is right and Democrats manage to hang on to the Senate, 2010 will not be as bad as 1994 when Democrats lost House and Senate. Even that looks grim though as Angle, Kirk, Buck, Toomey while Murray and Machin are close but close this year may not be enough with GOP showing a 10% turnout advantage so far.

    •  and all we really wanted them to do was try (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dave925, Cannae

      not make deals with the enemy

      "Without threats, rigged elections, media support, bribes, FEAR, and idiot voters, rethugs would win very few elections. But, that's how they roll." Me

      by lisastar on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 09:28:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  That is it. Dems just didn't try. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dave925, lisastar

        Hid behind filibuster combined with Obama's detached "let Congress do it" lack of leadership while he basked in overseas adulation only to see it all slip away as he touted do nothing bills as missions accomplished.

        Public looks at their lives of no jobs, no health care, kids schools losing teachers and on short weeks while Wall St pops champagne corks and sings "Happy days are here again", foreclosing on the 70% of America that lost homes, the kid's college money and retirement savings...and wonders WHAT are you talking about?  What ever White House genius thought up "Recovery Summer" as the summer campaign theme probably delivered the coup de grace, Democrats rubbing public's face in the disaster.

    •  The teabaggers are going to (0+ / 0-)

      be just as bummed when they see nothing happening on their pet projects.  And the independents are going to be mad when they realize that not only will these Republicans won't accomplish anything but obstruction.  So the electorate will keep batting back and forth until the Democrats start standing up for themselves, or the Republicans institute fascism.  Whichever comes first.  

      We only have to look at ourselves to see how intelligent life might develop into something we wouldn't want to meet. -Stephen Hawking

      by satanicpanic on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:04:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Tea baggers are ALWAYS bummed. Not reality based. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        fumie, Dave925, satanicpanic

        Tea baggers are not dealing in the real world. They think there are communists running DC, that Obama is a voodoo prince from Kenya, that fluoride in water is stealing their precious bodily essence. Tea baggers are the permanent cranks who are always with us.

        The tea baggers are the rocky bottom that shows up when the tide is low.

  •  This is all actually a strain in America that (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fumie, Dave925, irishwitch

    goes back to the 1960s and the politics of one Richard M. Nixon, who was a master at stoking the anxieties and frustrations of the majority.  I highly recommend Rick Perlstein's book Nixonland for some insight into how much Nixon shaped our modern politics.  Nixon, the outsider who was blackballed by the best schools and law firms, never got over his own frustrations and insecurities and used them in his politics.  In some respects, Nixon may be considered the antecedent of much of what motivates the Tea Party types today -- a person who occupies a relatively privileged position in American life yet feels besieged by the changes around them.

    •  and wasn't he a Quaker?? (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fumie, Dave925, irishwitch

      never understood that one

      "Without threats, rigged elections, media support, bribes, FEAR, and idiot voters, rethugs would win very few elections. But, that's how they roll." Me

      by lisastar on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 09:26:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  His Mother was Devout (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lisastar

        His father, not so much but he was a stern and some say unloving taskmaster.

        Nixon was like these fuckers in many ways, above all, Nixon felt he was a victim and everyone was out to get him. He was paranoid, feeling he was subject to a diferent set of rules than were rich Eastereners like the Kennedys or the then ruling elite of the Republican party. Nixon also had a well developed sense of self-pity. These are all traits common in Alcoholics though it's not known what comes first, the personality defects or the Alcohol but we can be sure alcohol magnifies them. But make no mistake, Nixon was an Alcoholic and though he wasn't the first or the last to occupy the WH, he was the first with a nuclear arsenal at his fingertips.

        My dad knew Nixon and has one of the most prescient takes on the man and it's sort of sad, like a lot about Nixon who really was a capable man but was so flawed it's a shame he was allowed into Politics in the first place. Ike didn't like Dick but had no choice in his selection because Nixon had one very powerful mentor in the Puke party and the Senate. Guess who? Prescott Bush, that's who. Nixon was able to return the favor in the early 70's, resurrecting GHW Shitboy Sr Bush from political obscurity (the guy could not win an election) and promoting him in the WH and the Party itself.

        Anyway, my dad's take on Nixon? He says Nixon most reminded him of the geeky kid we all knew in school, the one who tried so hard to be "one of the guys" but was so awkward about it, his behavior was just pathetic. That's how my dad views Nixon 40 years after he first met him. I think that's some real insight into the mass of neuroses and psychoses that was the Nixon creature.

        - Fools and dupes abound and wisdom is the subordinate of naked greed. What a country!

        by Dave925 on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 12:01:37 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  thanks (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Dave925

          for the history Dave.  : )

          He was a republican so I never like him anyway!

          And those Bushes suck, don't they?

          "Without threats, rigged elections, media support, bribes, FEAR, and idiot voters, rethugs would win very few elections. But, that's how they roll." Me

          by lisastar on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 12:05:39 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Golly, Lisa, They Sure Do! (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            lisastar

            In every great crime against the people of the United States and humanity at large that has occurred these past 100 years, there's been a Bush right there involved in it.

            They are a scourge upon us all.

            - Fools and dupes abound and wisdom is the subordinate of naked greed. What a country!

            by Dave925 on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 12:18:43 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  chip on their shoulder, (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fumie, Dave925

    selfish bastards who didn't make the million their prosperity pastor promised them and who didn't end up married to a Fox blonde talking head or Sarah Palin.  Not that the ladies would be having sex with them anyway.

    "Without threats, rigged elections, media support, bribes, FEAR, and idiot voters, rethugs would win very few elections. But, that's how they roll." Me

    by lisastar on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 09:25:16 PM PDT

    •  The Ladies Wouldn't be (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lisastar

      Having sex with them but the soul-less zombies they get attached to themselves apparently do.

      Thankfully, here in South OC, the depression recession has decimated the ranks of trophy wifedom as their husbands' questionable bidness schemes fall apart and blow up in their faces. Hahaha!

      There's considerably fewer maddened women with cell phones glued to their ears careening madly about while trying to whack their brats cavorting loose about the Lincoln Incomprehensible SUV that they all feel "safer" in (while the rest of us in sensible cars flee before them in fear for our very lives). No, thankfully there's a lot fewer of them around now.

      Just looking for that silver lining, you know. :)

      - Fools and dupes abound and wisdom is the subordinate of naked greed. What a country!

      by Dave925 on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 11:47:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I have to say it: down here in GA (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925, xxdr zombiexx

    ,any of those things are acceptable in polite society. The majority decides what's polite society and what's acceptable. Down here, the SOre WInners are the majority. In GA,they're gonna elect a guy as governor with all sorts of financial baggage who tried to change the rape shield laws to allow questiosn about the victim's past as soon as the prosecution entered physical evidence to prove that a rape occurred--somethign necessary to get a convbiction. So it's now acceptable to call a rape vicitm a slut who asked for it, jsut like it's okay to calla  women who had an abortion a babykilling tramp, and someoen who is on unemployment a bun.

    The last time we mixed religion and politics people got burned at the stake.

    by irishwitch on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 09:33:46 PM PDT

    •  Fuckin' baggers like the warm weather (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      irishwitch

      that's why they are infesting the South.

      Spray tons of carcinogens into the ocean to hide petroleum spewed from a hastily-drilled hole from a greedy corporation, but don't smoke pot.

      by xxdr zombiexx on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 06:15:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Nah. It's been like this for generations, sadly. (0+ / 0-)

        ANd lots of the baggers here--not heones whoa ttend rallies, the oens who vote--are young college age types. My hsuband was back in school, and he was the ONLY student in hsi core classes who was againt hte Iraq War, had been a vet or intended to seve (they lvoe war so logn as it doesn't affect them directly),  non-fundy, and a Dem/

        The last time we mixed religion and politics people got burned at the stake.

        by irishwitch on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 03:47:28 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  if it isn't o.k. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925

    then how come they seem to win so many elections.

    i'd say it's perfectly acceptible in "polite" American society, but there's them who don't want that changed.

    I wish more people were thoughtful and honest but being outraged is too much fun I suppose

    by Guinho on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 09:53:22 PM PDT

  •  I live down the road from two retired teachers (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925, hungrycoyote

    who vote Republican year after year after year and seem totally incapable of accepting that they are voting for a concept that is alien to their well being.  They live on Social Security and a fiscally challenged state teachers pension that the fat boy in Trenton seems bent upon cutting, yet they are incapable of pulling the lever for a Democrat.  Their biggest concern in the last Presidential election was that Obama was "pallin' around with terrorists."  These people are supposedly educated teachers but seem to be incapable of rationally determining what is good for them and what is ultimately good for the country.  I just don't get it.

    And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

    by MrJersey on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:00:07 PM PDT

  •  F***ing ignorant arrogant TeaBaggers (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925, xxdr zombiexx

    That's what we are up against in 2010.  I'm just telling it like it is.  

  •  No, this isn't correct. (2+ / 0-)

    We're witnessing, from the inside, the downside of a militaristic empire that is falling because it spent everything on war and almost nothing on peaceful things like schools and roads.

    The root causes are a lot deeper than than the superficial resentments mentioned in this essay. Can't recommend this.

    It is a calling ... to do things about injustice.... It helps to have a goal. I've always tried to have one.--Edward M. Kennedy, True Compass

    by Timaeus on Fri Oct 29, 2010 at 10:51:49 PM PDT

  •  Politically correct is such a burden for them (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925, bigjacbigjacbigjac

     It's not OK in polite society anymore to think of those of a differing race as literally another breed of human.  It's not OK in polite society anymore to make sexist or racist jokes, or to hold women to a sexual double-standard anymore.  Homophobia and religious wackoism aren't acceptable in most open polite society anymore either.

    Oh for the days "when girls were girls and men were men"

    We want our pre-existing conditions back - Tea-GOP

    by 88kathy on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 12:51:25 AM PDT

  •  I would not underestimate (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dave925, bigjacbigjacbigjac

    the influence of that portion of the monied elite that wants to use this sense of "sore winnerdom" as a tool to divide people, and so protect their wealth and privileges.  

    Consider that the economic engine of the Tea Party movement has been provided mainly by very rich people, like the Koch brothers.  Add in the packing of the Supreme Court with federalist conservatives like Roberts and Alito, and their convenient ruling in Citizens United, which essentially allows elections to be influenced by large infusions of untraceable cash.  This is our monied ruling class in action, taking steps to protect their wealth and position.  

    Finally, consider how this theme of "the Democrats are going to loose congress" has been pounded home by the corporate media.  This is not a question of neutral news reporting--it is a campaign, aimed at getting a particular result. Against this background, the Tea Party movement is a symptom, one that would not exist without all this help and encouragement from wealthy conservatives.  

  •  It's no longer OK (0+ / 0-)

    to be a racist Capitalist schmuck.

    That's a good thing for us non-racist socialist good folks.

    Spray tons of carcinogens into the ocean to hide petroleum spewed from a hastily-drilled hole from a greedy corporation, but don't smoke pot.

    by xxdr zombiexx on Sat Oct 30, 2010 at 06:09:21 AM PDT

  •  Greetings, "there is no spoon." (0+ / 0-)

    I am just getting back to finishing reading your post. I got side tracked by the link to Tom Junod's great writing over at Esquire. He has an excellent post about David Brooks as well. Thanks for the link. I sent Esquire a note of appreciation for Mr. Junod's writing, along with a link to your post. I am hopeful they will share it with him.

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